Tevez faces fine after defying club to fly home

 

Carlos Tevez will be in breach of his contract yet again and liable for another two-week fine unless the striker - who arrived in Buenos Aires on an unscheduled visit yesterday - attends training in Manchester at 10.30 this morning.

 

Tevez was granted yesterday off by the club but is due in today to continue training with City's reserves and youth teams after being told he would need to apologise to manager Roberto Mancini for his behaviour during a Champions League game with Bayern Munich in September if he is to play for the club again.

Yet the striker landed in Buenos Aires yesterday, clutching daughter Florencia and informing reporters he had travelled home "to relax for a few days".

It is believed, though, that the 27-year-old had twice been refused permission by the club to return to Argentina. The player's representatives sought approval for the journey over the weekend and Tevez himself asked on Monday. Both requests were turned down. Should he fail to attend this morning, he will be liable to the same fine as any player who does not train without a valid explanation: a two-week fine.

That will mean the striker is destined to pay the full four weeks' wages, around £1m, he was originally docked for insubordination in Bavaria. The player yesterday accepted a reduced punishment for that offence.

A City statement said: "Carlos returned from his recent trip to Argentina and was not match-fit. The coaches therefore devised a training plan to return him to full fitness. Carlos is part way through that plan and is due to resume his training tomorrow morning at Carrington following a rest day today."

Tevez had initially been informed by the club's internal disciplinary panel that he would be forced to forego a month's salary – worth a little shy of £1m – for five breaches of contract, but that was halved after the intervention of the Professional Footballers' Association.

The striker had until yesterday evening to contest that final punishment. Though Tevez's affairs are always clouded in uncertainty – City believed the deadline for his decision was 5pm, but the player's camp indicated it was as late as 8pm – it appeared he intended to abide by the reduced fine.

The club's disciplinary procedure against another former captain, Kolo Touré, ran more smoothly, with the Ivorian accepting a fine of six weeks' wages for failing a drugs test after the Manchester derby at Old Trafford last February. Touré, who had taken his wife's slimming pills without the knowledge of the club's doctors after convincing himself he was overweight, was suspended for six months after testing positive for a prohibited substance, during which time City continued to pay his wages.

Though a club statement declared that Touré had "accepted the decision" and wishes "to draw a line under this matter", it remains to be seen how long the 30-year-old stays at the club, with Paris St-Germain believed to be preparing an offer for a player who has lost his place in Mancini's side.

Likewise, Tevez continues to search for a possible refuge from his ostracism. Both Milan clubs and Corinthians are thought to be considering making offers as soon as the January transfer window opens, but sources in Argentina have also suggested he may be brought back to his homeland permanently by Boca Juniors president Jorge Amor Ameal, in an attempt to help him win the club's elections next month.

Though the Argentinian transfer window does not open until the end of the year, Ameal may pledge to bring Tevez back to the club where he started – and where he has always insisted he wishes to end his career.

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