Tottenham 3 Aston Villa 0 match report: Tim Sherwood puts a fan in hot seat – but who will be there next season?

It is expected to be the manager's last game in charge of Spurs

White Hart Lane

For Tim Sherwood and Paul Lambert this has been a season that has tried and tested them, and it may yet prove one that has finished them. The chant of “you’re getting sacked in the morning” that rang out from the visiting supporters during the first half could have been aimed at either dugout. Both managers will meet their employers this week and both could be gone by the end of it.

Sherwood grinned when the chant began as his side strolled to one of their easiest wins of the season, one that secures them sixth place. He turned to the Tottenham fans behind his dugout, laughed and said: “Bit harsh when you’re 3-0 up.”

There were plenty of smiles from the Spurs manager on Sunday. He insists he has enjoyed his time in charge and at one point invited a supporter from the crowd – one who has harangued him persistently over the months – into the manager’s seat, handing him his infamous gilet in the process.

“We’ve got the police looking for him because he’s nicked the gilet!” joked  Sherwood. The coat is gone and Sherwood seems certain to follow it out of White Hart Lane. But he will go proudly, convinced of his abilities.

He claimed if his win record – “it’s 59 per cent” – was spread over the season,  Tottenham would have qualified for the Champions League. That is not correct but since he took over only Liverpool and Manchester City have scored more goals.

“I have to have a meeting with the chairman and see what the future holds,” said Sherwood, who followed his squad around the pitch for the traditional lap of honour. Was he saying so long to a club he has served as player, coach and manager?

“No, not really,” he said. “If it is, life goes on. There were no tears. This club means a lot to me but if I’m not to continue here as manager I’ll be somewhere else. A quick decision would make sense.”

Chairman Daniel Levy wrote in his programme notes of the club “falling short”. It was not a vote of confidence in his manager, or soon-to-be former manager. As a  farewell performance this was pretty much in keeping with  Sherwood’s tenure – too good for those below them, not good enough to challenge those above.

Paulinho darted through Villa’s accommodating defence to open the scoring. Sharp passing from three of four Tottenham midfielders – Sandro was the absentee – created the opening. Paulinho’s first shot was saved by Brad Guzan, but he rolled in the rebound.

The American had already made two saves but a heavy afternoon’s workload was only just beginning. His side were lucky he did not have to pick the ball out of the net more than three times by half-time. Fabian Delph made an excellent tackle to deny Harry Kane when the young striker was through on goal and then Guzan saved a Michael  Dawson header.

The second goal arrived with an element of good  fortune. Danny Rose had time to pass to himself inside Villa’s box before hitting a cross that struck Emmanuel Adebayor and then Nathan Baker to fly past Guzan. The goalkeeper had even less chance with  Adebayor’s penalty two minutes later after Gabriel Agbonlahor turned his back on a Sandro shot and the ball struck his arm.

The visitors were better in the second half – everything’s relative – helped by Tottenham, with their day’s job done, struggling to keep their attention on the opposition rather than holiday villas. The Villa fans, many in fancy dress – including Bo Peep, a sheep and several traffic cones – maintained their buoyancy as their team sunk.

Delph’s shot nine minutes from the end was their first on goal and was greeted with huge cheers. Shortly afterwards a fancy dress Jesus was spotted in their midst. “Jesus, Jesus, we need a miracle,” went up the chant.

Randy Lerner, Villa’s owner, is due to clarify his intentions today. There are suggestions a takeover is imminent. Lerner and Lambert were set to speak last night and Lambert’s  position is precarious. His side finished 15th, grateful for the inadequacies of others.

“I’m every bit as disappointed as they are,” said the Scot of his own fans calling for his head. “I understand everybody’s frustration. It’s not nice to hear but I  understand it. “

Suggested Topics
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Bleacher Report

Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Day In a Page

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003