Villas-Boas set to outline plans for Chelsea

Andre Villas-Boas will be given the opportunity to outline his plans for Chelsea when officially unveiled as the Barclays Premier League club's new manager tomorrow morning.

At just 33, the Portuguese coach will be the youngest boss in the English top flight after he succeeded experienced Italian Carlo Ancelotti once the release from his contract with Porto had been agreed.

Villas-Boas promised evolution not revolution after succeeding Ancelotti, who celebrated an historic league and FA Cup double in his first full season at the helm before being unceremoniously axed after a barren campaign.

However, some changes behind the scenes are predicted, with long-serving first-team assistant coach Paul Clement set to leave, along with fitness coach Glen Driscoll and club doctor Bryan English.

The Blues' opening pre-season friendly against Vitesse Arnhem in Holland on July 9 has been cancelled at the request of the new manager, who wants more preparation time with the squad.

Villas-Boas is looking to bring in a new number two, after his preferred choice Vitor Pereira was appointed as his successor at Porto. Fitness coach Jose Mario Rocha and senior scout Daniel Sousa are, though, set to follow from the Dragons.

Michael Emenalo, assistant first-team coach under Ancelotti, could take up a technical director role.

The new Chelsea boss is also expected to be busy in the transfer market ahead of the new campaign, with Colombia striker Radamel Falcao and midfielder Joao Moutinho expected to follow him to Stamford Bridge from Porto.

Brazilian youngster Neymar, meanwhile, has been a long-term target for Chelsea, who had a number of bids rejected last summer.

However, Santos president Luis Alvaro de Oliveira Ribeiro has confirmed five clubs in Europe have agreed to pay the 45million Euro (£40million) release clause.

The clubs - reported as Real Madrid, Barcelona, Chelsea, Manchester City and Russian side Anzhi Makhachkala - will now be given permission to speak to the 19-year-old.

De Oliveira Ribeiro told ESPN Brasil: "We don't want to sell the player, but of course there is a release clause in his contract that can be paid. Five European clubs have offered to match the clause.

"I cannot name them because there is an agreement between Santos and the clubs, but they are the most important European clubs.

"They have asked to speak to the player and obviously we've allowed them to."

He added: "The clubs have behaved ethically. They sought out Santos first and were willing to pay the clause.

"Last year, Chelsea's attitude was different. Their first action was to seek out the player's representatives.

"With this ethical approach, they can talk to anyone - with Neymar's father, with [agent] Wagner Ribeiro, and with the representatives of Neymar.

"These clubs can come and make their offers, but if he wants to stay at Santos then he'll say no and stay at Santos."

Villas-Boas - whose release from his Porto contract cost some 13.2million Euros (£11.8million) - is also likely to face questions over whether he was first choice for the position.

Following Ancelotti's dismissal, it was widely reported former caretaker manager Guus Hiddink had emerged as the Blues' top target to reprise the role he enjoyed on a temporary basis following the departure of Luiz Felipe Scolari when guiding the Blues to FA Cup victory at Wembley in 2009.

However, after Villas-Boas was confirmed, Chelsea maintained the Portuguese coach was the "outstanding candidate for the job" and there had been no formal approach to the Dutchman, who remains in his post with the Turkish Football Federation.

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