Rangers owner Craig Whyte takes action against BBC

Rangers owner Craig Whyte has defended his business record and insists he has "nothing to be ashamed of" as allegations were made against him in a documentary aired last night.

Whyte instructed his lawyers to begin legal proceedings against the BBC following claims made in the programme, BBC Scotland Investigates: Rangers The Inside Story, which explored his business dealings before he bought the club from Sir David Murray in May.

Speaking in an interview with STV before the BBC documentary aired, Whyte said: "I'm sure the programme that's been made will no doubt make various allegations and it's maybe not going to be flattering about me but I've got nothing to be ashamed of.

"Ultimately, my track record speaks for itself.

"I'm here, I'm the owner of Rangers, I'm the chairman of Rangers and I've done a lot more successful deals than deals that haven't worked out. I think that ultimately speaks for itself."

Regarding the BBC programme, a spokesman for Whyte said last night: "Craig Whyte strenuously refutes these unfounded and defamatory allegations and has instructed his lawyers, Carter Ruck, to commence immediate legal proceedings against the BBC.

"Any repetition of these false accusations will also be met with legal action."

Responding to the statement, a BBC Scotland spokesman said: "We stand by the investigation which was produced according to our rigorous editorial standards on fairness, accuracy and impartiality.

"As the programme BBC Scotland Investigates: Rangers The Inside Story makes clear, Craig Whyte took the opportunity to respond to questions which were put to him during the course of the production."

Earlier this week, Rangers withdrew co-operation with the BBC ahead of the documentary, which the Clydesdale Bank Premier League club described as "little more than a prejudiced muckraking exercise".

However, the BBC strongly rejected claims of bias against the club and insisted the content of the programme was accurate and in the public interest.

Meanwhile, Whyte insists he is doing everything in his power to prevent the club from going into administration.

The Scottish champions are involved in two separate disputes with HM Revenue and Customs, relating to payments before Whyte completed his takeover.

The larger of those cases could leave Rangers facing an estimated tax bill of £49million.

Whyte has always maintained he is confident of winning the case but did address the issue of administration in the interview with STV.

He said: "It's certainly not something that we want to see happen and we are actively doing all we can to avoid it."

He ruled out the possibility of Rangers going under, adding: "There is no chance of Rangers going out of business, no chance whatsoever."

PA

Suggested Topics
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Bleacher Report

Daily Quiz
SPONSORED FEATURES
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Refugee crisis: David Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia - will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi?

Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia...

But will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi, asks Robert Fisk
Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Humanity must be at the heart of politics, says Jeremy Corbyn
Joe Biden's 'tease tour': Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?

Joe Biden's 'tease tour'

Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?
Britain's 24-hour culture: With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever

Britain's 24-hour culture

With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever
Diplomacy board game: Treachery is the way to win - which makes it just like the real thing

The addictive nature of Diplomacy

Bullying, betrayal, aggression – it may be just a board game, but the family that plays Diplomacy may never look at each other in the same way again
Lady Chatterley's Lover: Racy underwear for fans of DH Lawrence's equally racy tome

Fashion: Ooh, Lady Chatterley!

Take inspiration from DH Lawrence's racy tome with equally racy underwear
8 best children's clocks

Tick-tock: 8 best children's clocks

Whether you’re teaching them to tell the time or putting the finishing touches to a nursery, there’s a ticker for that
Charlie Austin: Queens Park Rangers striker says ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

Charlie Austin: ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

After hitting 18 goals in the Premier League last season, the QPR striker was the great non-deal of transfer deadline day. But he says he'd preferred another shot at promotion
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones