Boxing: Boos as Lewis retains world crown

Lennox Lewis retained his heavyweight crown after the referee stopped his fight against Vitali Klitschko at the end of the sixth round in Los Angeles.

The Brit took the fight in controversial fashion with the Ukrainian definitely upset at the decision in the Staples Centre.

Lewis retained his World Boxing Council crown after opening up two huge cuts above and below Klitschko's left eye.

Referee Lou Moret acted on Dr Paul Wallace's advice to stop the fight because of the severe injuries to the Californian-based fighter's face.

Klitschko paraded around the ring afterwards insisting he should have been allowed to continue and swung a couple of punches at Lewis as officials crowded round.

The decision was greeted with boos from many in the around 10,000 crowd at the arena.

But the decision gave Lewis his 15th victory in the 19th title bout of his career.

The Londoner can now face former middleweight champion Roy Jones Jnr in a money-spinning final pay-day before hanging up his gloves after a 14-year professional career.

Lewis had hinted before this fight - the heaviest heavyweight contest in history - that he would quit the ring after facing Jones.

The fight was stopped with Klitschko ahead by two points on all three judges' scorecards.

Lewis had looked in trouble as Klitschko clearly won the first two rounds.

The 37-year-old's sluggish opening raised fears he had not taken the fight seriously, as he did when he suffered his shock defeat to Hasim Rahman in South Africa just over two years ago.

But Lewis, half a stone heavier than when he demolished Mike Tyson in Memphis just over a year ago, responded like a champion in the third round.

Klitschko was left with blood pouring from a cut above his left eye as he was repeatedly caught by Lewis.

But Klitschko refused to buckle and took the next two rounds on the decision of two of the judges despite the cut again opening up.

Lewis opened up a cut below the eye in round six and this was enough to give him the disputed victory.

The referee stopped the fight just before the bell for the seventh round with the doctor saying that Klitschko could not see out of his left eye.

Klitschko was immediately out of his stool and was furious at the decision. There was nothing he could do.

Long after Lewis had left the ring to boos Klitschko was wandering round with arms aloft as in victory.

Lewis had come into the fight weighing his heaviest ever at 18st 4lb.

He felt Klitschko was lucky the fight was stopped as it saved the challenger from further punishment.

"There's no way he could have finished the fight," Lewis told Sky Box Office.

"If you look at the state of his face, there is no way. He is lucky the fight was stopped."

He insisted Klitschko had not proved a tougher challenger than he had expected.

"No, not really. Of course he can compete with me, that's why he is in the number one position.

"He would have got knocked out in the next couple of rounds. He was definitely deteriorating.

"I do give him credit. He has an unusual European style, plus I only had a week to prepare for it."

A big right hand opened the cut above Klitschko's left eye and led to the stoppage, and Lewis denied Klitschko had successfully avoided his big right hand.

"I wouldn't say he avoided them. The next couple of rounds would have told you the whole thing."

Lewis looked tired, but said: "I was just getting my second wind."

He conceded he was rocked by Klitschko in the second round, and added: "It definitely did wake me up. We're big guys, so any punch from both of us is going to hurt. I hurt him a couple of time - more times than he hurt me.

"I still feel he cannot go the distance with me. As you could see he was definitely deteriorating.

"I wanted it to be a dogfight, because I know when the going gets tough, the tough get going, and I am tougher than him."

Lewis feels Klitschko may have a case for a money-spinning rematch, and asked if the Ukrainian would get a second chance, said: "If it calls for it and the money is right, then yeah, definitely."

Dr Wallace believed he had to stop the fight because Klitschko was unable to defend himself.

He said: "He (Klitschko) had to move his head to see me. At that point I had no other option than to stop the fight.

"If he had to move his head to see me, there was no way he could defend himself."

However, Klitschko could not understand the decision to stop the fight, and claimed he would have won had the referee not intervened.

"Lennox Lewis does not have good condition, he is very heavy," Klitschko told Sky Box Office. "It was my strategy to make him tired.

"I see very well. I don't know why the doctor stopped the fight. I feel very well. I know I can fight.

"I know if this fight had gone on I would win. I would win the fight by points."

Sport
sportGareth Bale, Carl Froch and Kelly Gallagher also in the mix for award
News
Japan's Suntory Beverage & Food has bought GlaxoSmithKline's Lucozade and Ribena
news
News
A tongue-eating louse (not the one Mr Poli found)
newsParasitic louse appeared inside unfilleted sea bass
Life and Style
Out and about: for 'Glee' character Bert Hummel, having a gay son was a learning curve
lifeEven 'cool' parents need help parenting gay teens
PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Money
Anyone over the age of 40 seeking a loan with a standard term of 25 years will be borrowing beyond a normal retirement age of 65, and is liable to find their options restricted
propertyAnd it's even worse if you're 40
Arts and Entertainment
Perhaps longest awaited is the adaptation of Jack Kerouac’s On the Road with Brazil’s Walter Salles directing and Sam Riley, Kristen Stewart and Viggo Mortensen as the Beat-era outsiders
books
Arts and Entertainment
theatreSinger to join cast of his Broadway show after The Last Ship flounders at the box office
Life and Style
fashion'To start singing with Pharrell is not that bad, no?'
News
news
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Austen Lloyd: Employment Solicitor

£30000 - £60000 per annum + Excellent: Austen Lloyd: Employment Solicitor - Ke...

Argyll Scott International: Risk Assurance Manager

Negotiable: Argyll Scott International: Hi All, I'm currently recruiting for t...

Austen Lloyd: Clinical Negligence Solicitor

Highly Competitive Salary: Austen Lloyd: HAMPSHIRE MARKET TOWN - A highly attr...

Ashdown Group: IT Systems Analyst / Application Support Engineer (ERP / SSRS)

£23000 - £30000 per annum + pension, 25days holiday: Ashdown Group: An industr...

Day In a Page

In a world of Saudi bullying, right-wing Israeli ministers and the twilight of Obama, Iran is looking like a possible policeman of the Gulf

Iran is shifting from pariah to possible future policeman of the Gulf

Robert Fisk on our crisis with Iran
The young are the new poor: A third of young people pushed into poverty

The young are the new poor

Sharp increase in the number of under-25s living in poverty
Greens on the march: ‘We could be on the edge of something very big’

Greens on the march

‘We could be on the edge of something very big’
Revealed: the case against Bill Cosby - through the stories of his accusers

Revealed: the case against Bill Cosby

Through the stories of his accusers
Why are words like 'mongol' and 'mongoloid' still bandied about as insults?

The Meaning of Mongol

Why are the words 'mongol' and 'mongoloid' still bandied about as insults?
Mau Mau uprising: Kenyans still waiting for justice join class action over Britain's role in the emergency

Kenyans still waiting for justice over Mau Mau uprising

Thousands join class action over Britain's role in the emergency
Isis in Iraq: The trauma of the last six months has overwhelmed the remaining Christians in the country

The last Christians in Iraq

After 2,000 years, a community will try anything – including pretending to convert to Islam – to avoid losing everything, says Patrick Cockburn
Black Friday: Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Britain braced for Black Friday
Bill Cosby's persona goes from America's dad to date-rape drugs

From America's dad to date-rape drugs

Stories of Bill Cosby's alleged sexual assaults may have circulated widely in Hollywood, but they came as a shock to fans, says Rupert Cornwell
Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

As fans flock to see England women's Wembley debut against Germany, the TV presenter on an exciting 'sea change'
Oh come, all ye multi-faithful: The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?

Oh come, all ye multi-faithful

The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?
Dr Charles Heatley: The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

Dr Charles Heatley on joining the NHS volunteers' team bound for Sierra Leone
Flogging vlogging: First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books

Flogging vlogging

First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books
Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show: US channels wage comedy star wars

Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show

US channels wage comedy star wars
When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine? When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible

When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine?

When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible