Coe: London must build a trust fund

Belief in the people behind the bid will be 2012's decisive factor

Around lunchtime on Tuesday London will know whether it is still in the Olympic race. It might even know whether it remains a front-runner, or has fallen behind chief rivals Paris or even dark horses Rio in the bid to be host city in 2012.

Around lunchtime on Tuesday London will know whether it is still in the Olympic race. It might even know whether it remains a front-runner, or has fallen behind chief rivals Paris or even dark horses Rio in the bid to be host city in 2012.

In common with Paris, Rio and six other candidates - New York, Madrid, Moscow, Leipzig, Istanbul and Havana - London has submitted a 50-page "mini-bid" document which has been scrutinised and assessed by a 10-person working group of the International Olympic Committee over the past four months.

Their recommendations will be delivered to the 15 members of the IOC executive committee, including the president, Jacques Rogge, in Lausanne early on Tuesday morning. This jury will then decide who should go forward to contest the final vote in Singapore next June. The expect-ation is that they will eliminate two or three who do not come up to scratch.

It will be a shock of seismic proportions - not least an equally massive embarrassment - should London be one of them. Yet while this is improbable, nothing can be taken for granted in Olympic politics, and one hopes a planned "Celebration at the London Eye" on Tuesday night, culminating in the unveiling of a new London logo incorporating the Olympic rings, will not have to be hastily abandoned.

Far more likely to miss the cut are outsiders Istanbul, Havana and Leipzig. Some some believe that Moscow could go, too, although the IOC must feel reluctant to upset such a big Olympic player as Russia. The IOC may also "grade" the successful candidates in early order of merit, with Rio now reportedly alongside London.

In all, 25 questions had to be answered by the candidate cities, covering proposals on security, transportation, cost and infrastructure. In view of the turmoil that has beset Athens of late there might well have been an additional query: why bother?

The answer, according to double Olympic champion Sebastian Coe, is because it is worth it. He has no doubt London will be on the shortlist, and says there is one five-letter word which sums up why in the end London could get the final nod: trust.

"I think there is now a recognition that we have a serious team with some very focused people on board," he says. "Our major task is to introduce people to us and to allow us to take them into their comfort zone. I am confident we will get through to Singapore, and when the IOC members are sitting there with their fingers poised over the electronic voting pad, we have to have persuaded them that it is us they want to spend the next seven years with.

"Who is it they would feel most comfortable with? Who is it they can trust to deliver? Who is it to whom they can hand over their product and get it back in better nick?

"It is that confidence in us that I want to achieve before they get to that table. I want the IOC to know that we are good people. More than anything, we want them to like us. No one who gets to the business end of this contest is going to have glaring omissions or weaknesses.

"You can't bluff your way through this, so it will only be the serious contenders who are left. All the bids will be technically good, everyone will have made their numbers stack up, so actually it's not that at the end of the day upon which the final judgement will be made. They won't be worrying about legacy or too much extravagance or whether the bid is athlete- centric enough. That won't necessarily get you over the line. What will is whether they can look you in the eye and say, 'Yes, we can work with you and you can deliver'. I believe London can.

"People say it is a straight fight between us and Paris but I think it is far too early to make an assessment. We have to make sure our technical bid is incomparably better than the others, loophole-free, well costed and sound. But the last 40 metres of this particular race will be about trust, the very foundation of the bid."

No doubt similarly convincing arguments will be made in Lausanne by the London bid chairman, Barbara Cassani, and her chief executive, Keith Mills. For Cassani, clearly less than comfortable in the world of sports politics, it is a timely opportunity to forge vital friendships and gain the confidence of the IOC. She needs to go on a charm offensive to win the hearts and minds of those members who say privately that she has yet to convince them of her credibility as the bid figurehead.

It has not helped that since winning a lawsuit against the Daily Telegraph over the publication of remarks she denied making about Tony Blair, the American-born former airline chief seems to have gone media-shy.

She also missed a valuable PR opportunity by not attending the prestigious Laureus Awards in Lisbon last week, where she could have hobnobbed with virtually everyone who is anyone in international sport, including several prominent IOC members. Fortunately, three of her lieutenants, vice-chairmen Lord Coe and Alan Pascoe, and communications director Mike Lee, were on hand.

All are well-connected, and Coe is particularly adept at the glad-handing game. He says: "I sense a real momentum building for London. But votes are not going to be won by pressuring anyone. I have never asked anyone how they are going to vote, even when I was in politics, knocking on doors. You win a bid like this through building good relationships."

Doubtless this will be taken on board by London's leading lady as she flies to Switzerland tomorrow. Seasoned Olympic observers say that, in the sporting parlance, she needs to put herself about more.

Lausanne will provide that opportunity. Because in the end it is Cassani who will carry either the can - or London's Olympic torch.

News
Alan Bennett criticised the lack of fairness in British society encapsulated by the private school system
peopleBut he does like Stewart Lee
Sport
David Moyes and Louis van Gaal
football
Arts and Entertainment
Sheridan Smith as Cilla Black and Ed Stoppard as her manager Brian Epstein
tvCilla Episode 2 review: Grit under the glamour in part two of biopic series starring Sheridan Smith
Life and Style
Alan Turing, who was convicted of gross indecency in 1952, was granted a royal pardon last year
life
PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Life and Style
life
Arts and Entertainment
Tennis player Andy Murray's mum Judy has been paired with Anton du Beke for Strictly Come Dancing. 'I'm absolutely delighted,' she said.
tvJudy Murray 'struggling' to let Anton Du Beke take control on Strictly
Life and Style
Vote with your wallet: the app can help shoppers feel more informed about items on sale
lifeNew app reveals political leanings of food companies
Arts and Entertainment
The cover of Dark Side of the Moon
musicCan 'The Endless River' carry on the tradition? See for yourself
Sport
New Zealand fly-half Aaron Cruden pictured in The Zookeeper's Son on a late-night drinking session
rugby
Arts and Entertainment
Worldwide ticket sales for The Lion King musical surpassed $6.2bn ($3.8bn) this summer
tvMusical is biggest grossing show or film in history
Voices
A new app has been launched that enables people to have a cuddle from a stranger
voicesMaybe the new app will make it more normal to reach out to strangers
Arts and Entertainment
Salmond told a Scottish television chat show in 2001that he would also sit in front of a mirror and say things like,
tvCelebrity Trekkies from Alex Salmond to Barack Obama
News
i100
Life and Style
food + drink
News
Rob Merrick's Lobby Journalists were playing Ed Balls' Labour Party MPs. The match is an annual event which takes place ahead of the opening of the party conference
newsRob Merrick insistes 'Ed will be hurting much more than me'
News
A cabin crew member photographed the devastation after one flight
news
Life and Style
Carol O'Brien, whose son Rob suffered many years of depression
healthOne mother's story of how London charity Maytree helped her son with his depression
Caption competition
Caption competition
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

English Teacher

£120 - £162 per day: Randstad Education Hull: ENGLISH TEACHER REQUIRED - Humbe...

Chemistry Teacher

£120 - £162 per day: Randstad Education Hull: We are looking for a Qualified C...

Year 6 Teacher

£100 - £120 per day: Randstad Education Hull: Randstad Education are currently...

Year 1 Teacher

£90 - £120 per day: Randstad Education Hull: Year 1 Primary Supply Teachers ne...

Day In a Page

Secret politics of the weekly shop

The politics of the weekly shop

New app reveals political leanings of food companies
Beam me up, Scottie!

Beam me up, Scottie!

Celebrity Trekkies from Alex Salmond to Barack Obama
Beware Wet Paint: The ICA's latest ambitious exhibition

Beware Wet Paint

The ICA's latest ambitious exhibition
Pink Floyd have produced some of rock's greatest ever album covers

Pink Floyd have produced some of rock's greatest ever album covers

Can 'The Endless River' carry on the tradition?
Sanctuary for the suicidal

Sanctuary for the suicidal

One mother's story of how London charity Maytree helped her son with his depression
A roller-coaster tale from the 'voice of a generation'

Not That Kind of Girl:

A roller-coaster tale from 'voice of a generation' Lena Dunham
London is not bedlam or a cradle of vice. In fact it, as much as anywhere, deserves independence

London is not bedlam or a cradle of vice

In fact it, as much as anywhere, deserves independence
Vivienne Westwood 'didn’t want' relationship with Malcolm McLaren

Vivienne Westwood 'didn’t want' relationship with McLaren

Designer 'felt pressured' into going out with Sex Pistols manager
Jourdan Dunn: Model mother

Model mother

Jordan Dunn became one of the best-paid models in the world
Apple still coolest brand – despite U2 PR disaster

Apple still the coolest brand

Despite PR disaster of free U2 album
Scottish referendum: The Yes vote was the love that dared speak its name, but it was not to be

Despite the result, this is the end of the status quo

Boyd Tonkin on the fall-out from the Scottish referendum
Manolo Blahnik: The high priest of heels talks flats, Englishness, and why he loves Mary Beard

Manolo Blahnik: Flats, Englishness, and Mary Beard

The shoe designer who has been dubbed 'the patron saint of the stiletto'
The Beatles biographer reveals exclusive original manuscripts of some of the best pop songs ever written

Scrambled eggs and LSD

Behind The Beatles' lyrics - thanks to Hunter Davis's original manuscript copies
'Normcore' fashion: Blending in is the new standing out in latest catwalk non-trend

'Normcore': Blending in is the new standing out

Just when fashion was in grave danger of running out of trends, it only went and invented the non-trend. Rebecca Gonsalves investigates
Dance’s new leading ladies fight back: How female vocalists are now writing their own hits

New leading ladies of dance fight back

How female vocalists are now writing their own hits