Gallagher ban after positive cocaine test

The troubled career of Dean Gallagher will again hit a low point this morning when the Jockey Club is expected to receive confirmation from their French counterparts that the jumps jockey has tested positive for cocaine.

The troubled career of Dean Gallagher will again hit a low point this morning when the Jockey Club is expected to receive confirmation from their French counterparts that the jumps jockey has tested positive for cocaine.

Gallagher, 31, has received a six-months riding ban from France Galop following a random drugs test this spring and the suspension will be recognised worldwide.

The ban will derail a career which was implicated in the long-running doping and race-fixing allegations which have plagued the sport in recent years. Gallagher was one of four people arrested in January of 1998, in the aftermath of which he had his riding licence suspended by the Jockey Club. His professional life was virtually in limbo for the next 14 months until he was cleared of any wrongdoing in March of last year.

Gallagher's private life became the focus five months later when he married, and the tribulations of his workplace became ever distant when he then made his best ever start to a National Hunt season. Among those who noticed was Paul Green, the high-profile owner best known for his association with the enigmatic chaser Carvill's Hill.

Green appointed Gallagher as contract jockey to his 15-strong string, which included the Champion Hurdle aspirant, Hors La Loi III, on whom he soon won the Kingwell Hurdle at Wincanton.

Another success with Teaatral in the Rendlesham Hurdle at Kempton added further lustre to Gallagher's star, and via Green's connections in France the jockey soon also found himself in demand on the Continent.

In March he signed a six-month contract to ride in France for the leading owners Ecurie Zingaro and champion jumps trainer Jean-Paul Gallorini. Hors La Loi III was runner-up in the Champion Hurdle and Gallagher ended the season with a personal best of 51 winners and a growing string of admirers abroad which included Daniel Wildenstein. But, all the time, a timebomb was ticking away.

The jockey has been aware for some time that he had failed a test submitted on a trip to Paris, but had to wait for the legal processes to run and deliver his punishment. Gallagher will not now be able to ride again until the New Year.

It was not a good weekend either for two other members of the jumps jockeys' weighing room. Tony McCoy, who has already compiled 38 victories this summer, will not be riding any more winners for three weeks at least following an accident at Southwell yesterday.

The champion jockey was competing in division two of the Phoenix Roofing And Flooring Contractors Maiden Chase on Baron Allfours when he fell but did not rise.

"He was concussed so they have taken him to the Queens Medical Centre at Nottingham as a precautionary measure," a spokeswoman for Southwell said. "He will be stood down for 21 days.''

Tony Dobbin, the Grand National-winning jockey, will be off for even longer following a further dislocation to his left shoulder at Market Rasen on Saturday, an injury he sustained while riding Adamatic in the Tote Summer Special Chase.

"I was coming past the stands and just beginning to tail off so I picked up the stick to give him one and the shoulder popped out," Dobbin said. "I was in a lot of pain and pulled up the horse straight away. Peter Niven had to help me off after the race.

"That's the third time it has happened but the first time without a fall, so it's essential I have the operation now to stop it happening again. There is never a good time to be out but it is quite quiet at the moment.

"I'm automatically off for a month with a dislocated shoulder, but it will be longer because of having the operation. I'll know more after I've spoken to Dr [Michael] Turner [the Jockey Club's chief medical officer].''

We should know more today about the composition for Saturday's King George VI & Queen Elizabeth Stakes field at Ascot following the five-day declaration stage. Rumours are beginning to flourish that Montjeu, the Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe winner, will not now be travelling over for the race.

Coral have withdrawn the odds-on favourite from their ante-post market and now make Daliapour their 7-2 favourite for the race, with Fruits Of Love on 4-1. Both horses have been supported by clever money. Nevertheless, John Hammond, Montjeu's trainer, says he is not put off by the thought of good to firm ground at Ascot and his four-year-old remains an intended runner.

PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Ashdown Group: Marketing & Sales Manager

£40000 per annum: Ashdown Group: A reputable organisation within the leisure i...

Tradewind Recruitment: Science Teacher

£90 - £140 per day: Tradewind Recruitment: I am currently working in partnersh...

Recruitment Genius: Doctors - Dubai - High "Tax Free" Earnings

£96000 - £200000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Looking for a better earning p...

Recruitment Genius: PHP Developer

£32000 - £36000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: A rapidly expanding company in ...

Day In a Page

Isis hostage crisis: The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power

Isis hostage crisis

The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power, says Robert Fisk
Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Maverick artist Grayson Perry backs our campaign
Missing salvage expert who found $50m of sunken treasure before disappearing, tracked down at last

The runaway buccaneers and the ship full of gold

Salvage expert Tommy Thompson found sunken treasure worth millions. Then he vanished... until now
Assisted Dying Bill: I want to be able to decide about my own death - I want to have control of my life

Assisted Dying Bill: 'I want control of my life'

This week the Assisted Dying Bill is debated in the Lords. Virginia Ironside, who has already made plans for her own self-deliverance, argues that it's time we allowed people a humane, compassionate death
Move over, kale - cabbage is the new rising star

Cabbage is king again

Sophie Morris banishes thoughts of soggy school dinners and turns over a new leaf
11 best winter skin treats

Give your moisturiser a helping hand: 11 best winter skin treats

Get an extra boost of nourishment from one of these hard-working products
Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee
World War Z author Max Brooks honours WW1's Harlem Hellfighters in new graphic novel

Max Brooks honours Harlem Hellfighters

The author talks about race, legacy and his Will Smith film option to Tim Walker
Why the league system no longer measures up

League system no longer measures up

Jon Coles, former head of standards at the Department of Education, used to be in charge of school performance rankings. He explains how he would reform the system