Gallagher ban after positive cocaine test

The troubled career of Dean Gallagher will again hit a low point this morning when the Jockey Club is expected to receive confirmation from their French counterparts that the jumps jockey has tested positive for cocaine.

The troubled career of Dean Gallagher will again hit a low point this morning when the Jockey Club is expected to receive confirmation from their French counterparts that the jumps jockey has tested positive for cocaine.

Gallagher, 31, has received a six-months riding ban from France Galop following a random drugs test this spring and the suspension will be recognised worldwide.

The ban will derail a career which was implicated in the long-running doping and race-fixing allegations which have plagued the sport in recent years. Gallagher was one of four people arrested in January of 1998, in the aftermath of which he had his riding licence suspended by the Jockey Club. His professional life was virtually in limbo for the next 14 months until he was cleared of any wrongdoing in March of last year.

Gallagher's private life became the focus five months later when he married, and the tribulations of his workplace became ever distant when he then made his best ever start to a National Hunt season. Among those who noticed was Paul Green, the high-profile owner best known for his association with the enigmatic chaser Carvill's Hill.

Green appointed Gallagher as contract jockey to his 15-strong string, which included the Champion Hurdle aspirant, Hors La Loi III, on whom he soon won the Kingwell Hurdle at Wincanton.

Another success with Teaatral in the Rendlesham Hurdle at Kempton added further lustre to Gallagher's star, and via Green's connections in France the jockey soon also found himself in demand on the Continent.

In March he signed a six-month contract to ride in France for the leading owners Ecurie Zingaro and champion jumps trainer Jean-Paul Gallorini. Hors La Loi III was runner-up in the Champion Hurdle and Gallagher ended the season with a personal best of 51 winners and a growing string of admirers abroad which included Daniel Wildenstein. But, all the time, a timebomb was ticking away.

The jockey has been aware for some time that he had failed a test submitted on a trip to Paris, but had to wait for the legal processes to run and deliver his punishment. Gallagher will not now be able to ride again until the New Year.

It was not a good weekend either for two other members of the jumps jockeys' weighing room. Tony McCoy, who has already compiled 38 victories this summer, will not be riding any more winners for three weeks at least following an accident at Southwell yesterday.

The champion jockey was competing in division two of the Phoenix Roofing And Flooring Contractors Maiden Chase on Baron Allfours when he fell but did not rise.

"He was concussed so they have taken him to the Queens Medical Centre at Nottingham as a precautionary measure," a spokeswoman for Southwell said. "He will be stood down for 21 days.''

Tony Dobbin, the Grand National-winning jockey, will be off for even longer following a further dislocation to his left shoulder at Market Rasen on Saturday, an injury he sustained while riding Adamatic in the Tote Summer Special Chase.

"I was coming past the stands and just beginning to tail off so I picked up the stick to give him one and the shoulder popped out," Dobbin said. "I was in a lot of pain and pulled up the horse straight away. Peter Niven had to help me off after the race.

"That's the third time it has happened but the first time without a fall, so it's essential I have the operation now to stop it happening again. There is never a good time to be out but it is quite quiet at the moment.

"I'm automatically off for a month with a dislocated shoulder, but it will be longer because of having the operation. I'll know more after I've spoken to Dr [Michael] Turner [the Jockey Club's chief medical officer].''

We should know more today about the composition for Saturday's King George VI & Queen Elizabeth Stakes field at Ascot following the five-day declaration stage. Rumours are beginning to flourish that Montjeu, the Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe winner, will not now be travelling over for the race.

Coral have withdrawn the odds-on favourite from their ante-post market and now make Daliapour their 7-2 favourite for the race, with Fruits Of Love on 4-1. Both horses have been supported by clever money. Nevertheless, John Hammond, Montjeu's trainer, says he is not put off by the thought of good to firm ground at Ascot and his four-year-old remains an intended runner.

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
SPONSORED FEATURES
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Recruitment Genius: Personal Injury Fee Earners

£15000 - £25000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This specialist personal injury...

Recruitment Genius: New Business Sales Executive / Business Development

£20000 - £30000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Join a fast growing, UK based I...

Recruitment Genius: Tennant Liaison Officer

Negotiable: Recruitment Genius: An experienced TLO is required to manage, deli...

Guru Careers: Tax Manager / Accountant

£35 - £50k DOE: Guru Careers: A Tax Manager / Accountant (ACA / CA / CTA) is n...

Day In a Page

Turkey-Kurdish conflict: Obama's deal with Ankara is a betrayal of Syrian Kurds and may not even weaken Isis

US betrayal of old ally brings limited reward

Since the accord, the Turks have only waged war on Kurds while no US bomber has used Incirlik airbase, says Patrick Cockburn
VIPs gather for opening of second Suez Canal - but doubts linger over security

'A gift from Egypt to the rest of the world'

VIPs gather for opening of second Suez Canal - but is it really needed?
Jeremy Corbyn dresses abysmally. That's a great thing because it's genuine

Jeremy Corbyn dresses abysmally. That's a great thing because it's genuine

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, applauds a man who clearly has more important things on his mind
The male menopause and intimations of mortality

Aches, pains and an inkling of mortality

So the male menopause is real, they say, but what would the Victorians, 'old' at 30, think of that, asks DJ Taylor
Man Booker Prize 2015: Anna Smaill - How can I possibly be on the list with these writers I have idolised?

'How can I possibly be on the list with these writers I have idolised?'

Man Booker Prize nominee Anna Smaill on the rise of Kiwi lit
Bettany Hughes interview: The historian on how Socrates would have solved Greece's problems

Bettany Hughes interview

The historian on how Socrates would have solved Greece's problems
Art of the state: Pyongyang propaganda posters to be exhibited in China

Art of the state

Pyongyang propaganda posters to be exhibited in China
Mildreds and Vanilla Black have given vegetarian food a makeover in new cookbooks

Vegetarian food gets a makeover

Long-time vegetarian Holly Williams tries to recreate some of the inventive recipes in Mildreds and Vanilla Black's new cookbooks
The haunting of Shirley Jackson: Was the gothic author's life really as bleak as her fiction?

The haunting of Shirley Jackson

Was the gothic author's life really as bleak as her fiction?
Bill Granger recipes: Heading off on holiday? Try out our chef's seaside-inspired dishes...

Bill Granger's seaside-inspired recipes

These dishes are so easy to make, our chef is almost embarrassed to call them recipes
Ashes 2015: Tourists are limp, leaderless and distinctly UnAustralian

Tourists are limp, leaderless and distinctly UnAustralian

A woefully out-of-form Michael Clarke embodies his team's fragile Ashes campaign, says Michael Calvin
Blairites be warned, this could be the moment Labour turns into Syriza

Andrew Grice: Inside Westminster

Blairites be warned, this could be the moment Labour turns into Syriza
HMS Victory: The mystery of Britain's worst naval disaster is finally solved - 271 years later

The mystery of Britain's worst naval disaster is finally solved - 271 years later

Exclusive: David Keys reveals the research that finally explains why HMS Victory went down with the loss of 1,100 lives
Survivors of the Nagasaki atomic bomb attack: Japan must not abandon its post-war pacifism

'I saw people so injured you couldn't tell if they were dead or alive'

Nagasaki survivors on why Japan must not abandon its post-war pacifism
Jon Stewart: The voice of Democrats who felt Obama had failed to deliver on his 'Yes We Can' slogan, and the voter he tried hardest to keep onside

The voter Obama tried hardest to keep onside

Outgoing The Daily Show host, Jon Stewart, became the voice of Democrats who felt the President had failed to deliver on his ‘Yes We Can’ slogan. Tim Walker charts the ups and downs of their 10-year relationship on screen