Tyson Fury vs Dereck Chisora II: How I felt the foul force of Tyson Fury's fury

With women and children present, Fury unleashes a torrent of abuse and adds more when I ask him to control his language

Should Tyson Fury win the £100,000 side bet he has struck with opponent Dereck Chisora, it is likely he will be forced to hand over every penny to the British Boxing Board of Control when he is hauled before them next month. For if European champion Chisora fails to button the lip of the incorrigibly foul-mouthed gypsy giant, who defiantly continues to disgrace the sport, when they meet in a world heavyweight title eliminator in Manchester on Saturday, the Board’s angry stewards are determined to do so.

Fury has been warned he faces a six-figure fine and possible suspension of his licence.

This is a consequence of the latest outrage perpetrated by tiresome Fury when, at a public gathering in a west London cinema last week, including a number of women and young children, he spewed out  a stream of verbal sewage containing just about every obscenity in the louts’ lexicon, from A to W via b, c, d, f, m, s and t.

If it was a pathetic attempt to sell the fight it succeeded only in demeaning it, and himself.

I suffered the full fury of the vile Tyson tongue when I suggested he should curb his X-certificate language because of the composition of the audience and out of respect for the sport.  His shouted response was a torrent of abuse.

“I don’t give a f*** how many women and children are in the audience. We’re getting near to the fight and I’m in fight mode, kill mode.

“If you don’t like the station, change the channel, b****.

“This is my show, I do what I want. This is boxing, it isn’t tap-dancing. If anybody doesn’t like that they shouldn’t be here.”

He followed up with another tirade of cesspit obscenities.

It was the most reprehensible behaviour of its kind I have witnessed in any sport, and in most it would result in a lengthy ban.

He has previous. The board, whose general secretary Robert Smith has issued a public apology, twice previously have sanctioned Fury for similar salacious outbursts,in public and via Twitter, imposing fines totalling £9,000. He must now appear before them on 13 August, and will be suspended if he and his management fail to do so.

This could be imposed immediately should Fury repeat his behaviour when he and Chisora –whose own conduct has been exemplary – come face to face again at a media conference in Manchester on Thursday.

At least both combatants have got themselves into decent shape for a bout that is a repeat of their encounter three years ago, when Fury won a lop-sided affair against an out-of-shape Chisora.

The irony is Chisora was boxing’s villain not so long ago, once fined and banned for doing a Suarez on an opponent, then again for the infamous brawl with David Haye which followed the slapping and spitting incidents with the Klitschko brothers.

But Del Boy has taken his lumps, learned from his misdemeanours, and re-harnessed his career after an anger management course. He can hardly believe it himself, but he enters the Phones 4U ring as the good guy.

With so many other summer sporting distraction and the fact that it follows the fantastic Froch-Groves II Wembley extravaganza, this fight has been a hard enough sell without Fury undermining it and the rest of the attractive 17-fight Manchester card which also features the more appealing Romany, Billy Joe Saunders, in a European middleweight title challenge, plus Chris Eubank jnr.

One would hope that the revitalised Chisora has found the power to ram the 6ft 9in Fury’s dirty words back down his throat but my concern is that he doesn’t punch quite hard enough and unfortunately will again lose a brawling bout on points.

Which would leave the Board of Control to teach Fury to keep his trap shut. Time they made a bonfire of his profanities.

Fury vs Chisora is live on BoxNation (Sky 437/490HD & Virgin 546) next Saturday: www.boxnation.com

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