Racing: Phone call records lead to long ban for Carter

The rider's punishment - for an assortment of serious rules breaches, including passing information to punters about non-trying mounts - was the first to result from the Jockey Club's power, obtained through a High Court ruling, to examine the private mobile phone and computer records of an unlicenced individual.

The pattern of communication thus obtained between Carter and Christopher Coleman, a London-based tailor and gambler already declared a disqualified person, produced damning evidence of corrupt betting practice.

In July last year, Carter, 39, was charged with deliberately losing eight races inside an eight-week period in 2003 for financial gain. Those charges were later rescinded but after a hearing last month the Jockey Club's disciplinary panel, chaired by Lord Rath-creedan, found Carter guilty of the rules dealing with providing information for reward, aiding and abetting a breach of the rules, associating with an excluded person and endeavouring to mislead Jockey Club officials.

Neither Carter, who was also fined £2,000, nor Coleman attended the hearing. The ban on Coleman, who had admitted rewarding jockeys for information in 2001 when he gave evidence at the trial of ex-jockey Barrie Wright, who was acquitted of charges of conspiracy to import cocaine, was extended indefinitely and four of his associates similarly accused also warned off.

The eight horses involved were Meadaaf at Newmarket on 1 August, Aljazeera at Doncaster on 2 August, Kristal's Dream at Windsor on 4 August, Tasneef and Dodona at Lingfield on 8 August, Silvaline at Pontefract on 17 August, Saxe-Coburg at Warwick on 25 August and Lilli Marlene at Ascot on 26 September.

On each occasion, Carter rode a reasonably well- fancied horse that was beaten. Each of his mounts was heavily backed to lose through accounts at the Betfair betting exchange that were in the name of, or used by, the other individuals whose conduct was considered at the inquiry.

The betting patterns aroused suspicion at Betfair and the Jockey Club's security department began its detailed investigation. It was found that Carter made and received numerous calls to one particular mobile number - coded by the investigators as "the 163 number" - before and often within minutes of the end of the races in question, at a time before the Jockey Club's crackdown on jockeys' use of mobiles on the racecourse. Although the rider denied it, it was established that he was speaking to Coleman.

All Carter's mounts were laid to lose considerable sums on the exchanges. In the case of Meadaaf, a total of £52,682 was risked to win £10,127. In that of Dodona, it was £95,079 for just £13,174. The total laid out was £483,790 and the total return £83,121, easy money for a certain result.

In among all the telephone and computer evidence, there was one striking aspect of Carter's conduct that was considered something of a give-away.

In Dodona's race, the filly was beaten a short-head into second place after being coaxed, rather than driven, to challenge and was struck in the face by the winning jockey's whip. At a subsequent inquiry on the track, Carter hardly fought his corner, denying he had suffered any interference. The places remained unaltered and the bets were settled.

At a later appeal by Dodona's trainer Tim McCarthy, Carter changed his tune with a vengeance, claiming the only thing that had stopped her winning was the smack on the head. Lord Rathcreedan's panel concluded that Carter's evidence to their Lingfield colleagues had been shaped by his part in the corrupt betting operation.

Although charges of non-trying against Carter were withdrawn, the panel concluded that, in the light of other evidence that since emerged, the jockey did not ride the named horses to achieve the best possible result. He was passing information to Coleman about how his rides would perform, which motivated him and his allies to carry out their betting operation.

In a statement yesterday, Carter said he was "stun-ned", adding: "I am disappointed to hear the outcome of the case and believe this penalty very harsh."

Richard Edmondson

Nap: Galtee View

(Worcester 3.20)

NB: Breaking Breeze

(Wincanton 3.30)

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Arts and Entertainment
Larry David and Rosie Perez in ‘Fish in the Dark’
theatreReview: Had Fish in the Dark been penned by a civilian it would have barely got a reading, let alone £10m advance sales
News
Details of the self-cleaning coating were published last night in the journal Science
science
News
Approved Food sell products past their sell-by dates at discounted prices
i100
News
Life-changing: Simone de Beauvoir in 1947, two years before she wrote 'The Second Sex', credited as the starting point of second wave feminism
peopleHer seminal feminist polemic, The Second Sex, has been published in short-form to mark International Women's Day
News
i100
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Recruitment Genius: General Manager

£50000 - £70000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This provider of global logisti...

Recruitment Genius: Sales Manager - £70,000 OTE

£35000 - £70000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: A Sales Manager (Vice President...

Recruitment Genius: Digital Marketing Executive

£18000 - £20000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: A Digital Marketing Executive i...

Recruitment Genius: Finance Assistant / Credit Controller

£16000 - £18000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: They are an award-winning digit...

Day In a Page

Homeless Veterans campaign: Donations hit record-breaking £1m target after £300,000 gift from Lloyds Bank

Homeless Veterans campaign

Donations hit record-breaking £1m target after huge gift from Lloyds Bank
Flight MH370 a year on: Lost without a trace – but the search goes on

Lost without a trace

But, a year on, the search continues for Flight MH370
Germany's spymasters left red-faced after thieves break into brand new secret service HQ and steal taps

Germany's spy HQ springs a leak

Thieves break into new €1.5bn complex... to steal taps
International Women's Day 2015: Celebrating the whirlwind wit of Simone de Beauvoir

Whirlwind wit of Simone de Beauvoir

Simone de Beauvoir's seminal feminist polemic, 'The Second Sex', has been published in short-form for International Women's Day
Mark Zuckerberg’s hiring policy might suit him – but it wouldn’t work for me

Mark Zuckerberg’s hiring policy might suit him – but it wouldn’t work for me

Why would I want to employ someone I’d be happy to have as my boss, asks Simon Kelner
Confessions of a planespotter: With three Britons under arrest in the UAE, the perils have never been more apparent

Confessions of a planespotter

With three Britons under arrest in the UAE, the perils have never been more apparent. Sam Masters explains the appeal
Russia's gulag museum 'makes no mention' of Stalin's atrocities

Russia's gulag museum

Ministry of Culture-run site 'makes no mention' of Stalin's atrocities
The big fresh food con: Alarming truth behind the chocolate muffin that won't decay

The big fresh food con

Joanna Blythman reveals the alarming truth behind the chocolate muffin that won't decay
Virginia Ironside was my landlady: What is it like to live with an agony aunt on call 24/7?

Virginia Ironside was my landlady

Tim Willis reveals what it's like to live with an agony aunt on call 24/7
Paris Fashion Week 2015: The wit and wisdom of Manish Arora's exercise in high camp

Paris Fashion Week 2015

The wit and wisdom of Manish Arora's exercise in high camp
8 best workout DVDs

8 best workout DVDs

If your 'New Year new you' regime hasn’t lasted beyond February, why not try working out from home?
Paul Scholes column: I don't believe Jonny Evans was spitting at Papiss Cissé. It was a reflex. But what the Newcastle striker did next was horrible

Paul Scholes column

I don't believe Evans was spitting at Cissé. It was a reflex. But what the Newcastle striker did next was horrible
Miguel Layun interview: From the Azteca to Vicarage Road with a million followers

From the Azteca to Vicarage Road with a million followers

Miguel Layun is a star in Mexico where he was criticised for leaving to join Watford. But he says he sees the bigger picture
Frank Warren column: Amir Khan ready to meet winner of Floyd Mayweather v Manny Pacquiao

Khan ready to meet winner of Mayweather v Pacquiao

The Bolton fighter is unlikely to take on Kell Brook with two superstar opponents on the horizon, says Frank Warren
War with Isis: Iraq's government fights to win back Tikrit from militants - but then what?

Baghdad fights to win back Tikrit from Isis – but then what?

Patrick Cockburn reports from Kirkuk on a conflict which sectarianism has made intractable