Racing: Stubbs in the frame at Goodwood

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The Independent Online

Like many a person with a keen interest in race- horses, George Stubbs died in straitened circumstances. While the works of this now-celebrated equine artist hung in aristocrats' homes, Stubbs shared the destiny of many an artist and was a poor man when buried in a Marylebone graveyard in 1806.

Like many a person with a keen interest in race- horses, George Stubbs died in straitened circumstances. While the works of this now-celebrated equine artist hung in aristocrats' homes, Stubbs shared the destiny of many an artist and was a poor man when buried in a Marylebone graveyard in 1806.

Stubbs did leave a huge artistic legacy, of course, and the 4.35 race at Goodwood today is named in his honour as part of the build-up to a major exhibition of his work, "Stubbs and the Horse", at the National Gallery in London. Supported by Juddmonte Farms, it starts on 29 June.

Liverpool-born Stubbs had a special relationship with Goodwood. One of his first patrons was Charles Lennox, third Duke of Richmond, and in 1759 Stubbs was invited to the Duke's estate at Goodwood, where he spent nine months painting three canvases. One of these, The Duchess of Richmond and Lady George Lennox Watching the Duke's Racehorses at Exercise, 1759-60, can be seen at the exhibition.

It is a shame that Whistler is running in the 3.15 at Musselburgh.

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