Umpire deaf to appeal for abuse

Inside lines

The Commission for Racial Equality are investigating allegations that cricket officials in West Yorkshire have failed to take seriously the racial abuse of a black player. It follows an incident in the Bradford Cricket League involving Tony Bowry, who plays for Lightcliffe and is a cricket development officer with the Yorkshire Cricket Board. It is claimed that Bowry, who is black, was abused while he was at the crease in a game between Lightcliffe and Idle. His team-mates, including the captain, Bob Furness, a policeman, say the umpire took no action, but Furness, who confronted the official after the game, was banned for a month by the League after his protest. Now Lightcliffe, who claim nothing has been done by the League either about the alleged abuse or their complaint, have passed the matter to the CRE, who are investigating. The League say they have not taken up the matter because there was no report from the umpire. But their president, Albert Smith, claims there is no racism in the League. "Every

The Commission for Racial Equality are investigating allegations that cricket officials in West Yorkshire have failed to take seriously the racial abuse of a black player. It follows an incident in the Bradford Cricket League involving Tony Bowry, who plays for Lightcliffe and is a cricket development officer with the Yorkshire Cricket Board. It is claimed that Bowry, who is black, was abused while he was at the crease in a game between Lightcliffe and Idle. His team-mates, including the captain, Bob Furness, a policeman, say the umpire took no action, but Furness, who confronted the official after the game, was banned for a month by the League after his protest. Now Lightcliffe, who claim nothing has been done by the League either about the alleged abuse or their complaint, have passed the matter to the CRE, who are investigating. The League say they have not taken up the matter because there was no report from the umpire. But their president, Albert Smith, claims there is no racism in the League. "Every club have coloured players. One club have all coloured players. It's so easy to jump on the racist question. It happens both ways, you know, you get coloureds doing it." Chris Hassall, the chief executive of Yorkshire County Cricket Club, who is also secretary of the Yorkshire Cricket Board, says the Board are concerned about the incident. He describes Bowry as a "very mild-mannered guy who was deeply upset by the words alleged to have been used against him". He says it is up to the umpires to report all incidents involving racist abuse. "We can't tolerate this sort of thing, it is appalling." Quite.

Finger-flicking good in France

Our leftfielders continue to put their best feet forward. Practitioners of the various sporting eccentricities featured in these pages, from lawnmower racing to unicycling, have a habit of going on to greater things. Now we have news of another commendable achievement, this time from the wonderful world of sand marbles. Remember Jamie Lee Whitehouse, the little lad from Wolverhampton who won the British Championship on the Isle of Wight in June? Well, competing with the big boys, and girls, at the World Final in Royan, France, last week, he flicked his way to fourth place. Xavier Michelet, a 29-year-old truck driver from Le Mans, won the Mondial Billes Championship but, doubtless to Jamie's chagrin, the runner-up was an 11-year-old Belgian girl, Maxime Fourndeau, with a 15-year-old Bulgarian, Milen Dimitrov, third. Heats for next year's finals will be held at local shopping centres here in October. Roll up, as they say.

Moth proof against the developers

This one comes from the realms of Victor Meldrew's "I don't believe it" lexicon of the improbable. Britain's oldest shooting club has been saved from extinction - by a moth. It seems that the Wimbledon Park Rifle Club in south London, formed in 1904, were about to be blasted into history by developers, who have purchased the site and want to build a block of flats on it. But following objections from the club, Wandsworth Council have refused planning permission, citing the danger to indigenous "insect fauna". It transpires that the club harbour several species of lepidoptera, including the rare six-spot Burnet Moth and 20 species of butterfly which are known to breed on the site. Several areas of the club's land, where stinging nettles, food for moths and butterflies, have been allowed to develop, have been set aside as an important habitat for breeding purposes. "Obviously we are delighted, even though the developers are appealing," says the club captain, Martin Honey, who happens to be a biologist. "We'll continue the fight to preserve the club - and the moths." Bullseye for them. Let's hope the developers are mothballed.

Burning up the mountains

British marathon running seems to have gone downhill fast. But uphill? That's another story, and one which brings another nicely triumphant tale. A little-known British athlete is being hailed as something of a superhero in Switzerland after making history by winning, for the third time, an event which involves running 6,000 feet up a mountain and down the other side. Swiss newspapers call 30-year-old Billy Burns, from Preston, "The British Rocket", and the best mountain-racer of the age. Salford Harrier Burns, who completed the 20-mile Sierre-Zinal mountain marathon in 2hr 39min 5sec, competed for England in the Commonwealth Games but just missed out on Olympic selection as fourth-placed Briton in the London Marathon. Shame for Burns they didn't run it up Mount Pleasant.

United by fan power

Manchester United have never had the reputation of being the most fan-friendly club, but it may be a sign of changing times at Old Trafford that Shareholders United (the club's share-holding supporters' group) are deeply involved in Supporters Direct, a new initiative to be launched at London's Birkbeck College on Tuesday. The idea is to give fans a greater say in how their clubs are run. "A couple of years ago we couldn't have hoped for anything like this," says Birkbeck's School of Management head Professor Jonathan Michie, the chairman of Shareholders United. "At one time there would have been complete hostility, but United have created a Fans' Forum and given us a place on it. Now it is almost inconceivable that anyone would try to buy the club without first coming to us and discussing it." Even Sir Alex Ferguson welcomes the government-backed launch. "It can only be good for the game," he says. Wow!

insidelines@independent.co.uk

News
Pro-Russia rebels guard a train containing the bodies of victims of the Malaysia Airlines flight MH 17 crash in Torez, Ukraine
i100
Life and Style
Child's play: letting young people roam outdoors directly contradicts the current climate
lifeHow much independence should children have?
Arts and Entertainment
Tycoons' text: Warren Buffett and Bill Gates both cite John Brookes' 'Business Adventures' as their favourite book
booksFind out why America's richest men are reading John Brookes
Property
Sign here, please: Magna Carta Island
propertyYours for a cool £4m
PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Arts and Entertainment
Struggling actors who scrape a living working in repertory theatres should get paid a 'living wage', Sir Ian McKellen has claimed
theatre
News
Skye McCole Bartusiak's mother said she didn't use drink or drugs
peopleActress was known for role in Mel Gibson film The Patriot
News
i100
Arts and Entertainment
Damon Albarn is starting work on a new West End musical
artsStar's 'leftfield experimental opera' is turning mainstream
Life and Style
Paul and his father
artsPaul Carter wants to play his own father in the film of his memoirs
Sport
Ben Stokes trudges off after his latest batting failure for England as Ishant Sharma celebrates one of his seven wickets
cricket
Arts and Entertainment
Members of the public are invited to submit their 'sexcapades' to Russell T Davies' new series Tofu
tv
News
Sky's Colin Brazier rummages through an MH17 victim's belongings live on air
i100
Arts and Entertainment
Keira Knightley and Benedict Cumberbatch star in the Alan Turing biopic The Imitation Game
arts + ents'The Imitation Game' stars Benedict Cumberbatch and Keira Knightley
Extras
indybest
News
i100... and no one notices
Arts and Entertainment
Friends reunited: Julian Ovenden, Richard Cant and Matt Bardock in rehearsals for the Donmar revival of 'My Night
with Reg'
theatrePoignancy of Kevin Elyot's play being revived just after his death
Caption competition
Caption competition
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Year 5/6 Teacher

£100 - £120 per day: Randstad Education Chelmsford: The successful applicant w...

Year 5/6 Teacher

£21000 - £35000 per day: Randstad Education Chelmsford: The JobThe successful ...

Business Analyst (Systems/ Incident Analyst)

£40000 - £50000 Per Annum: Clearwater People Solutions Ltd: Business Analyst r...

SAP GRC Architect / Consultant

competitive: Progressive Recruitment: I am currently looking for a PERMANENT S...

Day In a Page

Some are reformed drug addicts. Some are single mums. All are on benefits. But now these so-called 'scroungers’ are fighting back

The 'scroungers’ fight back

The welfare claimants battling to alter stereotypes
Amazing video shows Nasa 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action

Fireballs in space

Amazing video shows Nasa's 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action
A Bible for billionaires

A Bible for billionaires

Find out why America's richest men are reading John Brookes
Paranoid parenting is on the rise - and our children are suffering because of it

Paranoid parenting is on the rise

And our children are suffering because of it
For sale: Island where the Magna Carta was sealed

Magna Carta Island goes on sale

Yours for a cool £4m
Phone hacking scandal special report: The slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

The hacker's tale: the slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

Glenn Mulcaire was jailed for six months for intercepting phone messages. James Hanning tells his story in a new book. This is an extract
We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

Child abusers are not all the same, yet the idea of treating them differently in relation to the severity of their crimes has somehow become controversial
The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

For instance, did Isis kill the Israeli teenagers to trigger a war, asks Patrick Cockburn
Alistair Carmichael: 'The UK as a whole is greater than the sum of its parts'

Alistair Carmichael: 'The UK as a whole is greater than the sum of its parts'

Meet the man who doesn't want to go down in history as the country's last Scottish Secretary
Legoland Windsor's master model-makers reveal the tricks of their trade (including how to stop the kids wrecking your Eiffel Tower)

Meet the people who play with Lego for a living

They are the master builders: Lego's crack team of model-makers, who have just glued down the last of 650,000 bricks as they recreate Paris in Windsor. Susie Mesure goes behind the scenes
The 20 best days out for the summer holidays: From Spitfires to summer ferry sailings

20 best days out for the summer holidays

From summer ferry sailings in Tyne and Wear and adventure days at Bear Grylls Survival Academy to Spitfires at the Imperial War Museum Duxford and bog-snorkelling at the World Alternative Games...
Open-air theatres: If all the world is a stage, then everyone gets in on the act

All the wood’s a stage

Open-air productions are the cue for better box-office receipts, new audiences, more interesting artistic challenges – and a picnic
Rand Paul is a Republican with an eye on the world

Rupert Cornwell: A Republican with an eye on the world

Rand Paul is laying out his presidential stall by taking on his party's disastrous record on foreign policy
Self-preservation society: Pickles are moving from the side of your plate to become the star dish

Self-preservation society

Pickles are moving from the side of your plate to become the star dish
Generation gap opens a career sinkhole

Britons live ever longer, but still society persists in glorifying youth

We are living longer but considered 'past it' younger, the reshuffle suggests. There may be trouble ahead, says DJ Taylor