Dyson ready to clean up in pursuit of Ryder Cup berth

Superb 65 puts Englishman in position for win which would virtually clinch spot

If only they could all be like Simon Dyson and Graeme McDowell. The pair will go out in the final round of the Wales Open here today with the mission of impressing Colin Montgomerie in deed and display. A week that began with all the talk of the Ryder Cup stayaways blessedly seems set to end with the Ryder Cup wannabes.

As it happens, Dyson will be rather more than a wannabe if he can overhaul Marcel Siem, the ponytailed German whom he trails by four shots. The Yorkshireman's second victory in the points race would take him to the very brink of qualification. Indeed, with more than €1.4 million (£1.2m) in the bank it would be difficult to imagine a scenario in which Dyson could not confirm his Ryder rookie status. All past data suggests he would require less than €100,000. And when you happen to be in all the major events – as Dyson is – that is as onerous an earner as Bill Gates wandering down to the cashpoint.

Dyson, however, does not want to know, does not want to acknowledge the carrot dangling before his eyes. His dander is up but his visor is down. "Don't tell me what I need or where I am in the Ryder Cup standings – I don't want to know," he said after a 65 put him on seven-under, the same mark as McDowell. "I'll look at the points lists tomorrow night if I win."

But he must know he is close; if only for the fact that the Europe captain broke the habit of a strife-time to pass on his encouragement. Colin Montgomerie does not talk to anybody after a 76 barring the odd Samaritan or club-repairer. Yet as he breezed by the journalists surrounding Dyson outside the scorer's hut he shouted over: "Well done, Simon."

Monty had been impressed all day. Dyson was playing in front of the old man, so the funereal pace professionals play nowadays dictated him witnessing each and every shot. No, he didn't miss one and for that matter, neither did Dyson. "It was perfect; Colin watched me all round and I didn't miss a shot all round," he said. "I was very conscious he was there. It was the chance for me to show him what I could do and how I've been playing for the last three weeks."

Dyson should not need to rely on Montgomerie's patronage come the end of August. The way the charts are stacking up, his wild cards could well be required by one or more of the experienced European campaigners. Do not believe a word of Montgomerie's warning last week. He will pick a Padraig Harrington, a Sergio Garcia, or even a Paul Casey, if they struggle to make it on merit and do not answer his call to travel over to the final qualifier in Scotland. If the big boys have buttoned down their berths then those such as McDowell will come into the reckoning. The Ulsterman put in a commendable performance in Kentucky two years ago and will do everything in his power to get the nod. If he needs it, that is.

"My objective this summer is to get myself on to the team," he said. "I'm under no illusions, it's going to be a tough task. We have six guys in the top 10, meaning that's half your team right there. I'm desperate to be back here in October but I'm going to need a couple of big weeks. And that's probably going to involve winning a tournament like this and a top three at one of the majors."

McDowell will likely need another round like yesterday, although the predicted bad weather may not allow a 64. This was a sun-kissed Saturday in which the pros danced between the hay. Stephen Gallagher's 63 was the best of the day, taking the in-form Scot alongside McDowell and Dyson. A rejuvenated Thomas Bjorn and Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano, both on eight-under, separate them from Siem. The pacesetter looked awfully comfortable in slipping the field with his 66. But the chasing pack have more incentive than the usual Tour trinkets of euros and kudos.

"If I play well here tomorrow, even win the tournament, then when it comes to the crunch Monty might pull up the stats and find out who played well here," said McDowell. "The big difference between me now and two years ago was that there was no chance I was a legitimate pick, but I will feel I have a shot this time. I'll be extremely motivated going into August, trying to show Monty I'm good enough to be on the team."

Another plus next to McDowell's name is the partnership he forged with Rory McIlroy at last year's Seve Trophy. "Let's be honest, anybody could partner Rory – he's that good," admitted McDowell. "But when push comes to shove it might be a factor." Yes, for the Monty Manor hopefuls the pushing and shoving has already begun.

PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Life and Style
A still from a scene cut from The Interview showing North Korean leader Kim Jong-un's death.
tech
Voices
'That's the legal bit done. Now on to the ceremony!'
voicesThe fight for marriage equality isn't over yet, says Siobhan Fenton
Life and Style
Approaching sale shopping in a smart way means that you’ll get the most out of your money
life + styleSales shopping tips and tricks from the experts
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Surrounded by high-rise flats is a little house filled with Lebanon’s history - clocks, rifles, frogmen’s uniforms and colonial helmets

Clocks, rifles, swords, frogmen’s uniforms

Surrounded by high-rise flats is a little house filled with Lebanon’s history
Return to Gaza: Four months on, the wounds left by Israel's bombardment have not yet healed

Four months after the bombardment, Gaza’s wounds are yet to heal

Kim Sengupta is reunited with a man whose plight mirrors the suffering of the Palestinian people
Gastric surgery: Is it really the answer to the UK's obesity epidemic?

Is gastric surgery really the answer to the UK's obesity epidemic?

Critics argue that it’s crazy to operate on healthy people just to stop them eating
Homeless Veterans appeal: Christmas charity auction Part 2 - now LIVE

Homeless Veterans appeal: Christmas charity auction

Bid on original art, or trips of a lifetime to Africa or the 'Corrie' set, and help Homeless Veterans
Pantomime rings the changes to welcome autistic theatre-goers

Autism-friendly theatre

Pantomime leads the pack in quest to welcome all
The week Hollywood got scared and had to grow up a bit

The week Hollywood got scared and had to grow up a bit

Sony suffered a chorus of disapproval after it withdrew 'The Interview', but it's not too late for it to take a stand, says Joan Smith
From Widow Twankey to Mother Goose, how do the men who play panto dames get themselves ready for the performance of a lifetime?

Panto dames: before and after

From Widow Twankey to Mother Goose, how do the men who play panto dames get themselves ready for the performance of a lifetime?
Thirties murder mystery novel is surprise runaway Christmas hit

Thirties murder mystery novel is surprise runaway Christmas hit

Booksellers say readers are turning away from dark modern thrillers and back to the golden age of crime writing
Anne-Marie Huby: 'Charities deserve the best,' says founder of JustGiving

Anne-Marie Huby: 'Charities deserve the best'

Ten million of us have used the JustGiving website to donate to good causes. Its co-founder says that being dynamic is as important as being kind
The botanist who hunts for giant trees at Kew Gardens

The man who hunts giants

A Kew Gardens botanist has found 25 new large tree species - and he's sure there are more out there
The 12 ways of Christmas: Spare a thought for those who will be working to keep others safe during the festive season

The 12 ways of Christmas

We speak to a dozen people who will be working to keep others safe, happy and healthy over the holidays
Birdwatching men have a lot in common with their feathered friends, new study shows

The male exhibits strange behaviour

A new study shows that birdwatching men have a lot in common with their feathered friends...
Diaries of Evelyn Waugh, Virginia Woolf and Noël Coward reveal how they coped with the December blues

Famous diaries: Christmas week in history

Noël Coward parties into the night, Alan Clark bemoans the cost of servants, Evelyn Waugh ponders his drinking…
From noble to narky, the fall of the open letter

From noble to narky, the fall of the open letter

The great tradition of St Paul and Zola reached its nadir with a hungry worker's rant to Russell Brand, says DJ Taylor
A Christmas ghost story by Alison Moore: A prodigal daughter has a breakthrough

A Christmas ghost story by Alison Moore

The story was published earlier this month in 'Poor Souls' Light: Seven Curious Tales'