Faldo and James bury hatchet

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The Independent Online

The feud between Nick Faldo and Mark James finally came to an end at the Lancÿme Trophy here yesterday. The two have been at loggerheads ever since the publication of James' controversial account of his Ryder Cup captaincy at Brookline last year.

The feud between Nick Faldo and Mark James finally came to an end at the Lancÿme Trophy here yesterday. The two have been at loggerheads ever since the publication of James' controversial account of his Ryder Cup captaincy at Brookline last year.

In the book Into the Bear Pit James revealed he had binned Faldo's good-luck note to the team after the six-times major winner had been told by James at the last counting event he would not be picked for the team even if he won.

The fall-out saw James asked to resign his role as Sam Torrance's vice-captain at The Belfry next year, but Faldo remained upset that James has not been punished for breaching European Tour rules on criticising fellow players - especially as the player known as "Jesse" is chairman of the players' tournament committee.

The saga appears to have finally come to a welcome end as the two contested the same tournament for the first time since James resigned on 1 August.

A draw which saw James in the group directly in front of Faldo gave them the perfect opportunity and with Faldo professing himself willing to talk, James duly waited for Faldo to finish.

Arrangements were made for a meeting and James declared that the matter had been resolved, although the chances of the two becoming close friends appears remote.

"We had a decent discussion and we both decided that there are two sides to each argument," James said. "We both decided we wanted to move on from here and both agreed that enough has been said. We have cleared the air and I think it's the end of the matter. I think we would both be pleased if that's the way it was.

"We don't want there to be an ongoing argument between us and I'm sure it won't be now. It's a satisfactory conclusion to the matter."

Faldo, who got the better of James on the course at least, firing a 70 to James' 73, was rather more terse, saying: "We have discussed it and that's it, it's over and done with. Whatever he said, the feeling is mutual."

The first-round pace was set by the South African Roger Wessels, who came home in just 30 shots for an eight-under-par 63. Spanish players filled the next few places with Miguel Angel Martin on seven under and Jose Maria Olazabal and Santiago Luña carding 65. The Australian left-hander Nick O'Hearn joined Martin in second place, closing with three straight birdies.

Scotland's Andrew Coltart was the best placed of the British contingent, an eagle and five birdies helping him to a five-under-par 66.

Colin Montgomerie, still nursing an injured back, had to settle for a 69 after four birdies and two dropped shots, while Lee Westwood was frustrated by an off day on the greens in his 68. It could have been even worse for the 27-year-old Englishman but for an eagle on the sixth, followed by a birdie on the seventh.

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