Ryder Cup: Tournament creates 'divide' between Europe and USA says Ian Poulter

 

Ian Poulter has asked himself a question about taking on the Americans
every two years - "how can you can be great mates with somebody, but,
boy, do you want to kill them in Ryder Cup?"

Poulter is preparing for his fourth cap in Chicago this week and expects to be just as fired up as he was on his first three appearances.

Asked if he could see a future in which the match loses its edge because so many Europeans have homes in the States, the 36-year-old Florida-based Englishman gave the expected answer.

"It means too much to us for it ever to lose that edge," he said.

"This event is unique. I hate to say we don't get on for three days, but there is that divide - and it's not that we don't like each other.

"We are all good friends, both sides of the pond, but there's something about Ryder Cup which kind of intrigues me."

This time half of Europe's side - Poulter, Justin Rose, Luke Donald, Graeme McDowell, Peter Hanson and Martin Kaymer - have bases in America, while Lee Westwood is soon to join them and world number one Rory McIlroy is selling his home in Northern Ireland, although he has no immediate plans to buy property this side of the Atlantic.

Poulter was also asked if captain Jose Maria Olazabal, who is expecting the crowds to be as noisy as they were in Boston in 1999 for the infamous "Battle of Brookline", had spoken about toning down celebrations.

"Are you kidding me? For real?," responded the man who won four points out of five four years ago and three points out of four last time in Wales.

"You are going to tell someone not to enjoy holing a putt? That's the Ryder Cup, that's what it means.

"You should enjoy it. Why not give it the fist pump and see them go bananas?

"It's like scoring a penalty in the Champions League final."

Poulter's use of the words "kill them" was put to McIlroy minutes later.

"I think 'kill' is a little strong," the 23-year-old Northern Irishman said. "I'd like to beat them."

Eight years ago Paul Casey found himself heckled in America after saying in the wake of the victory in Detroit that for the week of the match "we properly hate them". He soon regretted using the word.

Poulter has always been outspoken and has also always lapped up the atmosphere wherever the match is being played.

"I think Chicago is a great sporting town and this is going to be a very loud week," he added. "I think everybody's ready for that.

"For me it adds to the electricity, adds to the adrenaline rush and I can't wait to be obviously part of the fun for three days.

"I just love this event more than any other in the world. I get very excited to play, I get very proud to put this shirt on and have that (Ryder Cup) crest on my chest.

"I want to give it my all, I just love it.

"It's going to be intimidating, but it's going to be brilliant."

PA

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Fishing for votes with Nigel Farage: The Ukip leader shows how he can work an audience as he casts his line to the disaffected of Grimsby

Fishing is on Nigel Farage's mind

Ukip leader casts a line to the disaffected
Who is bombing whom in the Middle East? It's amazing they don't all hit each other

Who is bombing whom in the Middle East?

Robert Fisk untangles the countries and factions
China's influence on fashion: At the top of the game both creatively and commercially

China's influence on fashion

At the top of the game both creatively and commercially
Lord O’Donnell: Former cabinet secretary on the election and life away from the levers of power

The man known as GOD has a reputation for getting the job done

Lord O'Donnell's three principles of rule
Rainbow shades: It's all bright on the night

Rainbow shades

It's all bright on the night
'It was first time I had ever tasted chocolate. I kept a piece, and when Amsterdam was liberated, I gave it to the first Allied soldier I saw'

Bread from heaven

Dutch survivors thank RAF for World War II drop that saved millions
Britain will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power - Labour

How 'the Axe' helped Labour

UK will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power
Rare and exclusive video shows the horrific price paid by activists for challenging the rule of jihadist extremists in Syria

The price to be paid for challenging the rule of extremists

A revolution now 'consuming its own children'
Welcome to the world of Megagames

Welcome to the world of Megagames

300 players take part in Watch the Skies! board game in London
'Nymphomaniac' actress reveals what it was really like to star in one of the most explicit films ever

Charlotte Gainsbourg on 'Nymphomaniac'

Starring in one of the most explicit films ever
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers

Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi

The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers
Vince Cable interview: Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'

Vince Cable exclusive interview

Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'
Iwan Rheon interview: Game of Thrones star returns to his Welsh roots to record debut album

Iwan Rheon is returning to his Welsh roots

Rheon is best known for his role as the Bastard of Bolton. It's gruelling playing a sadistic torturer, he tells Craig McLean, but it hasn't stopped him recording an album of Welsh psychedelia
Morne Hardenberg interview: Cameraman for BBC's upcoming show Shark on filming the ocean's most dangerous predator

It's time for my close-up

Meet the man who films great whites for a living
Increasing numbers of homeless people in America keep their mobile phones on the streets

Homeless people keep mobile phones

A homeless person with a smartphone is a common sight in the US. And that's creating a network where the 'hobo' community can share information - and fight stigma - like never before