Tseng rides her luck to keep Kerr at bay

There was a moment on the 15th hole during her second round at the Ricoh Women's British Open here yesterday when Yani Tseng confessed: "I wanted to kill myself."

Golf has a habit of doing that to a person even when he or she – or that should be, especially when he or she – is holding a commanding lead in a major.

Fortunately for all involved, the suicidal thoughts abated and Tseng felt able to stride forward into a four-shot clubhouse advantage over a pack containing the mighty American Cristie Kerr. The Taiwanese rode her luck and rode away, only stopping afterwards to consider the break which broke her free.

The 21-year-old sliced her second shot on the par-five towards the gorse. Convinced it was a goner, she reloaded. "My provisional went 30 yards right of my first," she said. Plainly devastated, Tseng marched up to the rough, expecting to march straight back again to play a third ball, but was delighted to discover her original effort had located a clear patch. She was soon signing for a second successive 68 to stand at eight-under.

Annika Sorenstam would have approved. At the start of the season, the Swede advised Tseng how to become the world No 1. It consisted of the usual "stay patient, don't go for every pin" lines. This was not completely altruistic on the Swede's behalf as the girl was in the process of buying her house in Orlando. And as anyone in the desperate environs of Florida real estate would confirm, "whatever it takes". "Annika told me I had to fill the trophy room, but it's huge," Tseng said. "It looks so empty."

Seeing as Sorenstam won more than 90 titles over the 16 years which represent one of the game's most successful careers, Tseng has some catching up to do and perhaps it will be better for her ego if she picks on someone her own age. Step forward, Michelle Wie. Yesterday the Hawaiian followed up a hugely encouraging 70 with a 76 to fall to the middle reaches of the leaderboard. All the hype of the night previous had transmogrified once more into tripe.

Tseng might conclude it was ever thus with the Hawaiian 10 months her junior. In 2004, Tseng beat Wie in the final of the US Women's Public Links. Yet while the loser was built up into a global superstar, turning pro the next year as a 16-year-old, Tseng followed a more cautious path. She remained an amateur until she was 18 and then started on the Asian and Canadian Tours.

Which route worked? Money-grabbing or experience-gaining? Well, Tseng is the world No 5 and already has two majors to her name and Wie has not enjoyed a top-10 finish in a major in four years.

Alas, it wasn't just Wie nursing the bruises of golf's traditional backlash. There is not a Briton in the top 20 and last year's champion, Catriona Matthew, suffered a 10 – that included an air shot – on the par-four 13th. The Scot was close to tears as her defence ended in humiliation at 12-over. "Supermum" had been force-fed 81 shots of Kryptonite.

PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Isis hostage crisis: The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power

Isis hostage crisis

The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power, says Robert Fisk
Missing salvage expert who found $50m of sunken treasure before disappearing, tracked down at last

The runaway buccaneers and the ship full of gold

Salvage expert Tommy Thompson found sunken treasure worth millions. Then he vanished... until now
Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Maverick artist Grayson Perry backs our campaign
Assisted Dying Bill: I want to be able to decide about my own death - I want to have control of my life

Assisted Dying Bill: 'I want control of my life'

This week the Assisted Dying Bill is debated in the Lords. Virginia Ironside, who has already made plans for her own self-deliverance, argues that it's time we allowed people a humane, compassionate death
Move over, kale - cabbage is the new rising star

Cabbage is king again

Sophie Morris banishes thoughts of soggy school dinners and turns over a new leaf
11 best winter skin treats

Give your moisturiser a helping hand: 11 best winter skin treats

Get an extra boost of nourishment from one of these hard-working products
Paul Scholes column: The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him

Paul Scholes column

The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him
Frank Warren column: No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans

Frank Warren's Ringside

No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans
Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee