Wie helps put US out in front - Golf - Sport - The Independent

Wie helps put US out in front

Michelle Wie played her part but it was a superb collective performance that enabled the Americans to take an unlikely overnight lead in the 33rd Curtis Cup. Having lost all three of the morning foursomes, the United States won the singles 5-1 to move in front by a single point.

Michelle Wie played her part but it was a superb collective performance that enabled the Americans to take an unlikely overnight lead in the 33rd Curtis Cup. Having lost all three of the morning foursomes, the United States won the singles 5-1 to move in front by a single point.

Whether it was the sunshine, being able to wear shorts or simply playing as a single rather than in combination, the visitors looked far more comfortable in the afternoon.

Wie, the 14-year-old Hawaiian prodigy, finished the day with one win out of two, but her victory over Anna Highgate by 5 and 4 faded into the mix as Great Britain and Ireland, battling not to lose a fourth successive match, were overwhelmed in the singles.

Yorkshire's Emma Duggleby won the home side's only point while Danielle Masters at least took her match to the last. Dugglebyrecovered from two-down after seven to win 3 and 2 against Liz Janangelo. "The conditions were tricky with the wind, and the course was playing faster and faster in the sunshine," Duggleby said. "When I looked at the scoreboard I knew how important my point was."

Masters, a 21-year-old from Kent, almost joined Duggleby in winning two points on the day, which looked unlikely when she was three-down with four to play against Erica Blasberg. The Californian had four birdies in five holes before losing the next three.

She missed the green at all three holes and came to the last all-square, knowing that a win for either player would put their team ahead. After what she had gone through, it was impressive that Blasberg hit her approach to eight feet and holed the putt for birdie.

Only once before, in 1986, had GB & I won a series of foursomes 3-0 and that led to their first victory on American soil. Today, history of another sort beckons as victory would mean all four of the major team trophies residing on this side of the Atlantic for the first time.

It was cool as well as windy early in the day and the foursomes produced scrappy golf, if exciting conclusions as the home side briefly raised the hopes of a large gallery.

Wie, certainly the centre of attention, had to wait for her opponents to play four times, twice from sand, before hitting her first shot for her country. Wie showed her obvious power and talent, although in the conditions there was a fine line between an easy gracefulness and appearing gangly. Her main problem was missing a worrying number of short putts.

At the last, she comfortably outdrove the home side but left her partner in the right rough with a pitch over a greenside bunker and Brittany Lang duly found the sand.

Wie played a delicate recovery that deserved a half but, following Anne Laing's approach to 15 feet pin-high, her Irish partner Claire Coughlin rolled in the putt for the win, accompanied by a huge roar. Duggleby and Shelley McKevitt won 3 and 2 in the top match, while the Kent pair of Masters and Nicola Timmins also won at the last.

By now most of the crowd of around 7,500 had arrived, something these players, Wie apart, have never experienced. But the home players seemed to be inspired and there were plenty of smiles and waves of acknowledgement.

"The way we look at Michelle is, she has two arms, two legs and fourteen clubs, like everyone else," said the home captain, Ada O'Sullivan. "We played fantastic against her in the morning but she was superb in the singles. [But] we are only one point behind and there is no reason we can't come back tomorrow."

Suggested Topics
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Daily Quiz
SPONSORED FEATURES
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Refugee crisis: David Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia - will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi?

Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia...

But will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi, asks Robert Fisk
Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Humanity must be at the heart of politics, says Jeremy Corbyn
Joe Biden's 'tease tour': Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?

Joe Biden's 'tease tour'

Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?
Britain's 24-hour culture: With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever

Britain's 24-hour culture

With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever
Diplomacy board game: Treachery is the way to win - which makes it just like the real thing

The addictive nature of Diplomacy

Bullying, betrayal, aggression – it may be just a board game, but the family that plays Diplomacy may never look at each other in the same way again
Lady Chatterley's Lover: Racy underwear for fans of DH Lawrence's equally racy tome

Fashion: Ooh, Lady Chatterley!

Take inspiration from DH Lawrence's racy tome with equally racy underwear
8 best children's clocks

Tick-tock: 8 best children's clocks

Whether you’re teaching them to tell the time or putting the finishing touches to a nursery, there’s a ticker for that
Charlie Austin: Queens Park Rangers striker says ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

Charlie Austin: ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

After hitting 18 goals in the Premier League last season, the QPR striker was the great non-deal of transfer deadline day. But he says he'd preferred another shot at promotion
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones