Injury to Amokachi worries Everton

Everton 3 KR Reykjavik 1 (Everton win 6-3 on aggregate)

GUY HODGSON

Everton 3 KR Reykjavik 1 (Everton win 6-3 on aggregate)

Everton's progress in the European Cup-Winners' Cup was overshadowed last night when Daniel Amokachi had to be taken to a neurological unit at Walton Hospital after losing consciousness in a collision.

The Nigerian striker, scorer of the winner when these teams met in Iceland two weeks ago, underwent a brain scan after leaving Goodison still in a semi-conscious state. "Normally we don't worry when Daniel goes down because he's a strong lad," Joe Royle, the Everton manager, said, "but it was obvious when he came off he was quite poorly."

The accident happened in the 37th minute when Amokachi rose for a ball with Pormodur Egilsson and his team-mate Joe Parkinson. There was a clash of heads with the Reykjavik defender and Amokachi fell heavily and awkwardly but there was nothing to suggest he would be badly injured.

"Our physio, Les Helm, was on the pitch double-quick and he made the decision straight away that Daniel would have to come off," Royle said. He was treated by paramedics immediately and then transferred to hospital.

"I just ran in and challenged for the ball," Parkinson said. "Daniel's such a thick-set lad so it must have taken quite something to knock him out. I just hope he's OK."

Amokachi's condition, Royle said, meant the match did not matter. "He's having scans and a neuro-surgeon has been sent for. He got caught on the temple which, of course, is the softest part of the head. He never regained full consciousness although his eyes were flickering when he went off. We will have to wait and see.

"We don't want to get too carried away either way and I hope I'm right that the thing will settle down. On the football side of it, it's certain he won't play for a month, it's such a bad knock.

"We are now trying to contact his wife who is modelling somewhere on the Continent. But we'll find her. He is in the right place. We must just keep our fingers crossed now. It is just a matter of having to wait and see."

As for the match, itself, it would not have lingered in the memory even without Amokachi's injury. Royle had warned against conceding sloppy goals - a trait they have picked up in the Premiership - but Reykjavik's opener did not suggest his players had been listening. Mihajilo Bibercic passed the ball towards where the home centre-backs should have been but Einar Por Danielsson was allowed an unhindered passage towards Neville Southall. The Icelandic international midfielder drew the goalkeeper and slipped it under him.

A 1-0 deficit at half-time had not been anticipated but the scoreline was given a new gloss when Neville Southall had to change direction and go full stretch to his right to keep out a shot by Gudmundur Benediktss that was deflected off Dave Unsworth towards the bottom corner.

What Royle's reaction was to all this can only be imagined but Everton began the second half playing like the paint had been burnt off the dressing- room walls and, in the opening 10 minutes, looked considerably more threatening than they had been during the whole of the previous 45.

After 52 minutes, Parkinson hit a shot from 25 yards that shaved a post and two minutes later Paul Rideout had a powerful header that Kristjan Finnbogason did well to get down to at the foot of his left-hand post.

Nevertheless there was a definite sense of the tide turning and after 56 minutes Everton got an equaliser. Earl Barrett crossed from the right and Rideout beat his man in the air to head backwards for Graham Stuart on the edge of the area. He hit an acrobatic volley and he was fortunate to see the ball bounce off Brynjar Gunnarson and loop past Finnbogason into the net.

Seconds later Unsworth struck a shot that ricocheted off the crossbar and when Tony Grant controlled a pass from John Ebbrell and thumped a 20-yard shot in off the post after 65 minutes it was clear that Everton's crisis was over. Rideout's goal, three minutes from time, merely concluded the inevitable.

Everton (4-4-2): Southall; Barrett, Short, Unsworth, Hinchcliffe; Grant, Ebbrell, Parkinson, Limpar; Amokachi (Stuart, 38), Rideout.

KR Reykjavik (5-3-2): Finnbogason; S B Jonsson, Adolfsson, Egilsson, Gunnarsson, Dervic; Bjornsson, Gudjonsson, Danielsson; Benediktss (Porca, 81), Bibercic (Asmundur, 81).

Referee: L Gadosi (Slovakia).

Celtic's progress, results, page 30

PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Life and Style
Suited and booted in the Lanvin show at the Paris menswear collections
fashionParis Fashion Week
Arts and Entertainment
Kara Tointon and Jeremy Piven star in Mr Selfridge
tvActress Kara Tointon on what to expect from Series 3
Voices
Winston Churchill, then prime minister, outside No 10 in June 1943
voicesA C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
News
i100
News
An asteroid is set to pass so close to Earth it will be visible with binoculars
news
Arts and Entertainment
Benedict Cumberbatch has spoken about the lack of opportunities for black British actors in the UK
film
News
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Austen Lloyd: Private Client Solicitor - Oxford

Excellent Salary : Austen Lloyd: OXFORD - REGIONAL FIRM - An excellent opportu...

Austen Lloyd: Clinical Negligence Associate / Partner - Bristol

Super Package: Austen Lloyd: BRISTOL - SENIOR CLINICAL NEGLIGENCE - An outstan...

Recruitment Genius: Sales Consultant - Solar Energy - OTE £50,000

£15000 - £50000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Fantastic opportunities are ava...

Recruitment Genius: Compute Engineer

Negotiable: Recruitment Genius: A Compute Engineer is required to join a globa...

Day In a Page

Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

Army general planning to come out
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project