F1: Red Bull officially appeal disqualification of Daniel Ricciardo from second place in Australian Grand Prix

Ricciardo finished on the podium much to the delight of his home crowd, only to be disqualified hours later for a fuel flow violation

Red Bull have formally confirmed their intention to appeal against Daniel Ricciardo's disqualification from Sunday's Australian Grand Prix.

Ricciardo had initally thrilled his home crowd at Melbourne's Albert Park in finishing runner-up to Mercedes' Nico Rosberg, only for the stewards to later exclude him from the race classification due to a technical fuel infringement with his Red Bull.

After immediately serving notice of their intention to appeal, the team were then given 96 hours to process their application, doing so just ahead of Thursday's deadline via the Austrian motor sport federation.

A hearing will now go before the FIA's Court of Appeal at a date yet to be determined.

The latest set of regulations, to accommodate the introduction of the new 1.6-litre V6 turbo-charged power units and various accompanying energy-saving devices, have swiftly resulted in the first challenge.

Among them is the cars now start with a maximum 100 kilograms of fuel, as opposed to 140-150kg in previous seasons, and operate with a fuel-flow rate of no more than 100kg per hour.

Ricciardo's car, however, was found to consistently exceed that rate during the race.

In layman's terms, the fuel-flow rate is monitored by an FIA meter, manufactured by Gill Sensors, who are based in Lymington, Hampshire.

Following Ricciardo's disqualification, on his debut for Red Bull after being promoted from Toro Rosso as replacement for Mark Webber, team principal Christian Horner claimed the sensors were "unreliable".

Horner stated there was an issue with the sensor that changed its reading through Friday practice, which was replaced on Saturday but failed during qualifying.

Red Bull, of their own volition, chose to use their own sensor to determine the fuel-flow rate which had not been cleared by the FIA.

FIA technical director Charlie Whiting confirmed Red Bull were warned against doing so, both after qualifying and again five laps into the race, but chose to ignore the directive.

Addressing his team's actions, Horner said on Sunday: "These fuel-flow sensors that have been fitted by the FIA have proved problematic throughout the pit lane since the start of testing.

"There have been discrepancies in them, even unreliable. We had a fuel-flow sensor fitted to the car that we believe to be in error.

"We wouldn't be appealing if we weren't extremely confident we have a defendable case."

Red Bull will now have to prove the FIA sensor was defective and that their own device was not in error.

Earlier this week Gill Sensors issued a statement claiming the FIA had provided them "with positive feedback" about their equipment that is based on ultrasonic technology.

The statement added the FIA further confirmed "their confidence in the development" and the meters "meet the FIA's accuracy specification".

Horner, though, slated the system as "immature technology" and that it was "impossible to rely (on it) 100 per cent".

Pending the outcome of the appeal, the race result, with McLaren duo Kevin Magnussen and Jenson Button promoted to second and third behind Rosberg, remains provisional.

PA

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
News
Johnny Depp is perhaps best known for his role as Jack Sparrow in Pirates of the Caribbean
peopleBut how did he break it?
Arts and Entertainment
Paul Walker and Vin Diesel in Fast and Furious 5
film
Sport
Lewis Hamilton secured his second straight pole of the season
f1Vettel beats Rosberg into third after thunderstorm delays qualifying
Caption competition
Caption competition
  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

The saffron censorship that governs India: Why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression

The saffron censorship that governs India

Zareer Masani reveals why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression
Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Supreme Court rules Dominic Grieve's ministerial veto was invalid
Distressed Zayn Malik fans are cutting themselves - how did fandom get so dark?

How did fandom get so dark?

Grief over Zayn Malik's exit from One Direction seemed amusing until stories of mass 'cutting' emerged. Experts tell Gillian Orr the distress is real, and the girls need support
The galaxy collisions that shed light on unseen parallel Universe

The cosmic collisions that have shed light on unseen parallel Universe

Dark matter study gives scientists insight into mystery of space
The Swedes are adding a gender-neutral pronoun to their dictionary

Swedes introduce gender-neutral pronoun

Why, asks Simon Usborne, must English still struggle awkwardly with the likes of 's/he' and 'they'?
Disney's mega money-making formula: 'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan

Disney's mega money-making formula

'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan
Lobster has gone mainstream with supermarket bargains for £10 or less - but is it any good?

Lobster has gone mainstream

Anthea Gerrie, raised on meaty specimens from the waters around Maine, reveals how to cook up an affordable feast
Easter 2015: 14 best decorations

14 best Easter decorations

Get into the Easter spirit with our pick of accessories, ornaments and tableware
Paul Scholes column: Gareth Bale would be a perfect fit at Manchester United and could turn them into serious title contenders next season

Paul Scholes column

Gareth Bale would be a perfect fit at Manchester United and could turn them into serious title contenders next season
Inside the Kansas greenhouses where Monsanto is 'playing God' with the future of the planet

The future of GM

The greenhouses where Monsanto 'plays God' with the future of the planet
Britain's mild winters could be numbered: why global warming is leaving UK chillier

Britain's mild winters could be numbered

Gulf Stream is slowing down faster than ever, scientists say
Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Donation brings total raised by Homeless Veterans campaign to at least £1.25m
Oh dear, the most borrowed book at Bank of England library doesn't inspire confidence

The most borrowed book at Bank of England library? Oh dear

The book's fifth edition is used for Edexcel exams
Cowslips vs honeysuckle: The hunt for the UK’s favourite wildflower

Cowslips vs honeysuckle

It's the hunt for UK’s favourite wildflower
Child abuse scandal: Did a botched blackmail attempt by South African intelligence help Cyril Smith escape justice?

Did a botched blackmail attempt help Cyril Smith escape justice?

A fresh twist reveals the Liberal MP was targeted by the notorious South African intelligence agency Boss