F1: Red Bull officially appeal disqualification of Daniel Ricciardo from second place in Australian Grand Prix

Ricciardo finished on the podium much to the delight of his home crowd, only to be disqualified hours later for a fuel flow violation

Red Bull have formally confirmed their intention to appeal against Daniel Ricciardo's disqualification from Sunday's Australian Grand Prix.

Ricciardo had initally thrilled his home crowd at Melbourne's Albert Park in finishing runner-up to Mercedes' Nico Rosberg, only for the stewards to later exclude him from the race classification due to a technical fuel infringement with his Red Bull.

After immediately serving notice of their intention to appeal, the team were then given 96 hours to process their application, doing so just ahead of Thursday's deadline via the Austrian motor sport federation.

A hearing will now go before the FIA's Court of Appeal at a date yet to be determined.

The latest set of regulations, to accommodate the introduction of the new 1.6-litre V6 turbo-charged power units and various accompanying energy-saving devices, have swiftly resulted in the first challenge.

Among them is the cars now start with a maximum 100 kilograms of fuel, as opposed to 140-150kg in previous seasons, and operate with a fuel-flow rate of no more than 100kg per hour.

Ricciardo's car, however, was found to consistently exceed that rate during the race.

In layman's terms, the fuel-flow rate is monitored by an FIA meter, manufactured by Gill Sensors, who are based in Lymington, Hampshire.

Following Ricciardo's disqualification, on his debut for Red Bull after being promoted from Toro Rosso as replacement for Mark Webber, team principal Christian Horner claimed the sensors were "unreliable".

Horner stated there was an issue with the sensor that changed its reading through Friday practice, which was replaced on Saturday but failed during qualifying.

Red Bull, of their own volition, chose to use their own sensor to determine the fuel-flow rate which had not been cleared by the FIA.

FIA technical director Charlie Whiting confirmed Red Bull were warned against doing so, both after qualifying and again five laps into the race, but chose to ignore the directive.

Addressing his team's actions, Horner said on Sunday: "These fuel-flow sensors that have been fitted by the FIA have proved problematic throughout the pit lane since the start of testing.

"There have been discrepancies in them, even unreliable. We had a fuel-flow sensor fitted to the car that we believe to be in error.

"We wouldn't be appealing if we weren't extremely confident we have a defendable case."

Red Bull will now have to prove the FIA sensor was defective and that their own device was not in error.

Earlier this week Gill Sensors issued a statement claiming the FIA had provided them "with positive feedback" about their equipment that is based on ultrasonic technology.

The statement added the FIA further confirmed "their confidence in the development" and the meters "meet the FIA's accuracy specification".

Horner, though, slated the system as "immature technology" and that it was "impossible to rely (on it) 100 per cent".

Pending the outcome of the appeal, the race result, with McLaren duo Kevin Magnussen and Jenson Button promoted to second and third behind Rosberg, remains provisional.

PA

PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

In a world of Saudi bullying, right-wing Israeli ministers and the twilight of Obama, Iran is looking like a possible policeman of the Gulf

Iran is shifting from pariah to possible future policeman of the Gulf

Robert Fisk on our crisis with Iran
The young are the new poor: A third of young people pushed into poverty

The young are the new poor

Sharp increase in the number of under-25s living in poverty
Greens on the march: ‘We could be on the edge of something very big’

Greens on the march

‘We could be on the edge of something very big’
Revealed: the case against Bill Cosby - through the stories of his accusers

Revealed: the case against Bill Cosby

Through the stories of his accusers
Why are words like 'mongol' and 'mongoloid' still bandied about as insults?

The Meaning of Mongol

Why are the words 'mongol' and 'mongoloid' still bandied about as insults?
Mau Mau uprising: Kenyans still waiting for justice join class action over Britain's role in the emergency

Kenyans still waiting for justice over Mau Mau uprising

Thousands join class action over Britain's role in the emergency
Isis in Iraq: The trauma of the last six months has overwhelmed the remaining Christians in the country

The last Christians in Iraq

After 2,000 years, a community will try anything – including pretending to convert to Islam – to avoid losing everything, says Patrick Cockburn
Black Friday: Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Britain braced for Black Friday
Bill Cosby's persona goes from America's dad to date-rape drugs

From America's dad to date-rape drugs

Stories of Bill Cosby's alleged sexual assaults may have circulated widely in Hollywood, but they came as a shock to fans, says Rupert Cornwell
Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

As fans flock to see England women's Wembley debut against Germany, the TV presenter on an exciting 'sea change'
Oh come, all ye multi-faithful: The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?

Oh come, all ye multi-faithful

The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?
Dr Charles Heatley: The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

Dr Charles Heatley on joining the NHS volunteers' team bound for Sierra Leone
Flogging vlogging: First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books

Flogging vlogging

First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books
Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show: US channels wage comedy star wars

Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show

US channels wage comedy star wars
When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine? When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible

When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine?

When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible