Mosley warns rise in power will lead to fatalities

Max Mosley, the president of Formula One's governing body, the FIA, believes that the sport is in serious danger of a repeat of the Imola weekend in 1994 when Roland Ratzenberger and Ayrton Senna lost their lives in separate accidents.

No drivers have been killed in Formula One since then, but there is a growing body of opinion that things are spiralling out of control and that the current cars are simply too fast.

Mosley is determined to introduce 2.4-litre V8 engines for 2006 to reduce horsepower levels and therefore lap speeds. Thethree-litre V10s used at present produce 920bhp. But while Mosley believes a V8 would produce 650 to 700bhp, simple arithmetic of bhp/cc suggests something closer to 740. He is so adamant that he may even drive successful manufacturers such as BMW and Honda away.

"They argue that they could produce regulated V10s, but we say to them that even if you are right - and they are not - motor sport cannot take the risk of going on with these very powerful engines in the light of evidence we've had of the inherent dangers," Mosley said here following Sunday's Chinese Grand Prix.

"The main boards of these companies should give very careful consideration to litigating against us. They should not use their huge financial resources to force an independent governing body against their judgement to go along with something adjudged to be dangerous. It is not just the drivers and marshals we worry about; the people in the grandstands are entitled to believe we have taken all steps to make sure it's safe.

"At Le Mans in 1955 more than 80 people were killed when a Mercedes-Benz crashed into a tribune opposite the pits. A few hours later that same space was packed with people standing in the blood of those who were killed. You cannot imagine that being allowed to happen today. Everything would be shut down and there would be a major enquiry. Society has changed."

There are other concerns that the tyre war between Bridgestone and Michelin has escalated to a dangerous level. The spate of recent punctures at Indianapolis, Spa and here on Sunday, involving Michael Schumacher, has convinced some that the greatest potential for a fatality lies in that area, rather than in sheer horsepower, though the two are linked.

A meeting on Sunday of the technical working group produced a show of hands in which all parties appeared to be in favour of the imposition of single tyre supply rather than a cut in horsepower.

That would cut expensive tyre development, provide a simple supply means of cutting costs by limiting testing, and wipe out one of Schumacher's biggest advantages, the unique relationship he and Ferrari enjoy with Bridgestone.

If Ferrari are in favour, that may go some way to explaining the foul mood that Schumacher was in as others celebrated at the weekend.

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Arts and Entertainment
Ugne, 32, is a Lithuanian bodybuilder
tvThey include a Lithuanian bodybuilder who believes 'cake is a sin' and the Dalai Lama's personal photographer
Arts and Entertainment
Amazon have just launched their new streaming service in the UK
music
News
Frankie Boyle
people
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
SPONSORED FEATURES
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Solved after 200 years: the mysterious deaths of 3,000 soldiers from Napoleon's army

Solved after 200 years

The mysterious deaths of 3,000 soldiers from Napoleon's army
Every regional power has betrayed the Kurds so Turkish bombing is no surprise

Robert Fisk on the Turkey conflict

Every regional power has betrayed the Kurds so Turkish bombing is no surprise
Investigation into wreck of unidentified submarine found off the coast of Sweden

Sunken sub

Investigation underway into wreck of an unidentified submarine found off the coast of Sweden
Instagram and Facebook have 'totally changed' the way people buy clothes

Age of the selfie

Instagram and Facebook have 'totally changed' the way people buy clothes
Not so square: How BBC's Bloomsbury saga is sexing up the period drama

Not so square

How Virginia Woolf saga is sexing up the BBC period drama
Rio Olympics 2016: The seven teenagers still carrying a torch for our Games hopes

Still carrying the torch

The seven teenagers given our Olympic hopes
The West likes to think that 'civilisation' will defeat Isis, but history suggests otherwise

The West likes to think that 'civilisation' will defeat Isis...

...but history suggests otherwise
The bald truth: How one author's thinning hair made him a Wayne Rooney sympathiser

The bald truth

How thinning hair made me a Wayne Rooney sympathiser
Froome wins second Tour de France after triumphant ride into Paris with Team Sky

Tour de France 2015

Froome rides into Paris to win historic second Tour
Fifteen years ago, Concorde crashed, and a dream died. Today, the desire to travel faster than the speed of sound is growing once again

A new beginning for supersonic flight?

Concorde's successors are in the works 15 years on from the Paris crash
I would never quit Labour, says Liz Kendall

I would never quit party, says Liz Kendall

Latest on the Labour leadership contest
Froome seals second Tour de France victory

Never mind Pinot, it’s bubbly for Froome

Second Tour de France victory all but sealed
Oh really? How the 'lowest form of wit' makes people brighter and more creative

The uses of sarcasm

'Lowest form of wit' actually makes people brighter and more creative
A magazine editor with no vanity, and lots of flair

No vanity, but lots of flair

A tribute to the magazine editor Ingrid Sischy
Foraging: How the British rediscovered their taste for chasing after wild food

In praise of foraging

How the British rediscovered their taste for wild food