Inside Lines: Carr in the driving seat to follow Mapp

Although he seems certain to resist overtures to challenge Lord Moynihan as chairman of the British Olympic Association next month, sailing supremo Rod Carr is in line for another top job, as chairman of Sport England. As we reveal in these pages, factions close to the Government have been pushing for Carr to stand against Tory peer Moynihan for political reasons. But Carr, chief executive of the Royal Yachting Association and the man regarded as architect of sailing's Olympic successes, seems ideally placed to take the helm at Sport England, where the chair has been vacant for nine months since the Labour-supporting millionaire Derek Mapp quit after a policy disagreement. Linford Christie, meanwhile, has put his name forward for the new post of UK Athletics coach after the departure of Dave Collins from the now- defunct job of performance director. Christie reckons the job should be filled by someone with experience of the sport, which Collins lacked. But Seb Coe would have apoplexy if someone tainted by drugs controversy was in charge of the sport he is desperate to clean up.

Davies is likely target for top role in London

The resignation after six years of Giselle Davies as the International Olympic Committee's director of communications raises speculation that the 39-year-old multi-lingual daughter of commentator Barry will head home for a high-powered role with London 2012. But Davies, who had a tough time in Beijing defending the IOC's sitting on the Great Wall over human rights, will surely be a prime target for the British Olympic Association. The BOA are seeking a top-level communications chief to raise their profile internationally in the run-up to the London Games.

Party's over and Beijing reverts to type

As the Paralympics begin, here is a reminder that the nation which was to become enlightened by the Games is quickly reverting to type. British Paralympian Kristina Veasey, a member of Amnesty International and a former wheelchair basketball player, is calling for the release of blind Chinese lawyer Chen Guangcheng, jailed for four years for "gathering people to block traffic". As she says: "It is essential we don't get fooled again by the so-called promises to improve human rights. If anything the situation has got worse." Quite. This is the regime that sent two ladies aged 77 and 79, one disabled, for "re-education through labour" for making a mild protest while the world marvelled at the Games.

Gold dust paves the way for Tour of Britain

Just how firmly Britain has been gripped by cycling fever may be judged by the turn-out for the stages of the week-long Tour of Britain which gets underway today (see page 82). Will all the glorious gold dust of Beijing pave the streets of London in the opening stage? No one would suggest that the nation will ever be as captivated by the wheelies as the rest of Europe, but the phenomenal feats on road and track in Beijing should ensure a decent send-off for Bradley Wiggins and fellow Olympians Chris Newton and Geraint Thomas as they pedal their way through the countryside.

At 60, Rosenthal shows he is not sounding his age

Good to hear Jim Rosenthal in good voice on BBC Radio Five Live's 'Sportsweek' on the day his contract ended with ITV after 28 years. In legal talks with the commercial channel, he will be encouraged by Selena Scott, at 57 three years his junior, suing for £1m damages citing "ageism" after being ditched by TV's Five.

insidelines@independent.co.uk

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