And the Olympic gold for political opportunism goes to Prime Minister David Cameron

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The PM has tried to take maximum advantage of every Team GB success

1. July 27th: Opening Ceremony

David Cameron began his Olympic appearances as he did not mean to go on – by turning out in a smart suit and tie for the Opening Ceremony. Although Tory MP Aidan Burley called the event "multi-cultural crap", the PM was not having that, slapping him down for being "idiotic." Mr Cameron clearly wanted to be seen enjoying the Games as much as everyone else.

2. July 28th: Cycling road race

Mr Cameron was straight out to watch the end of the 156-mile road cycling race, in which Britain's Mark Cavendish was hot favourite. Our five-man team set the pace but were eventually passed by a 32-strong group, and did have the strength to hit back. Cavendish came 29th. People began murmuring about the "Curse of Cameron" – when he turns up, we lose.

3. July 30th: Handball & Hollande

Mr Cameron, in a suit but no tie, joined France's President Francois Hollande to watch the handball. France was well ahead of the UK in the competition for medals, and the President could not resist a dig. "The British have rolled out a red carpet for French athletes to win medals," he said. That evening, Mr Cameron saw Tom Daley and Peter Waterfield come a disappointing fourth in the synchronised diving, reinforcing the Curse of Cameron theory.

4. August 2nd: Judo with Putin

Today's visiting world leader was Vladimir Putin. He and Mr Cameron watched the judo finals, and saw a Russian take the gold, while Britain's Emma Gibbons could only manage silver. The PM turned up at the Velodrome later, prompting boos from fans who feared he would jinx the Brits. But all was well as the men's team took the gold.

5. August 3rd: At the Velodrome

Mr Cameron was back at the Velodrome again, and almost at once it seemed the curse was back, when a tiny miscalculation caused Victoria Pendleton and Jess Varnish to be relegated from the team sprint. But our three-man cycling team led by Chris Hoy powered their way to goldl. Mr Cameron then went to Team GB HQ to see Katherine Grainger and Anna Watkins take rowing gold.

6. August 4th: At the athletics

Mr Cameron did not look as if he was enjoying the athletics that much. All the pictures of him captured a strained expression, possibly because he was placed alongside a more casual looking Prince William, who spent much of the time chatting with his wife. That was, until Mo Farah won the 10,000m and he even hugged Boris.

7. August 7th: Beach volleyball

The beach volleyball was being held on Horse Guards Parade, so close to Number 10 that Mr Cameron complained of being "driven mad" by the music. Reputedly, the female contestants in their skimpy beach costumes were not in the PM's direct line of sight from the office, but he went to watch them wearing a serious expression with his wife Samantha.

8. August 8th: At the boxing

Mr Cameron was greeted with more "pantomime boos" when he showed up to watch Nicola Adams's semi-final against Mary Kom. But the curse didn't strike as she went on to win.

9. August 9th: Swimming and TV

Mr Cameron turned out at the Serpentine in his navy blue Olympic sweatshirt to watch the climax of the 10km race in which Keri-Anne Payne narrowly failed to win a medal. Later, Downing Street put out a photograph of the lonely looking PM, still casually dressed, sitting in front of a screen watching Nicola Adams win gold. He was so close to screen some worried he could damage his eyes.

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