Triathlon: Alistair Brownlee may turn to track after incredible run in gold medal performance

 

Alistair Brownlee could try his luck on the track after producing a phenomenal run to win Olympic gold in the triathlon yesterday.

The 24-year-old Yorkshireman went into the race as the world champion and hot favourite but he was pushed hard by Javier Gomez and needed to produce a brilliant 10-kilometre run split of 29 minutes and seven seconds to hold off the Spaniard.

That was only a minute and 37 seconds slower than Mo Farah's time in winning 10,000 metres gold on Saturday.

The inevitable question is how fast could he run if he had not previously swum 1500m and cycled 43km, and Brownlee is keen to find out, raising the possibility of running on the track in the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow in two years' time.

He played down the comparisons with Farah, though, and dismissed any hopes of competing in the Olympics in athletics, saying: "You have to run 27min 30sec to qualify for the 10km at the Olympics, which I think is pretty much impossible for me.

"It's probably a step too far. I was absolutely going as fast as I could for the whole 10km and Mo Farah definitely wasn't, so I think that's the difference there.

"I would love to give it a try, especially for Glasgow, where the standard isn't quite as fast. Maybe to give me something a bit different, have a new avenue to go down, and try to do it as well as triathlon."

Brownlee is certainly not about to give up on triathlon, though, and he is keen to defend his title in Rio de Janeiro in four years' time.

The Leeds athlete said: "Four years seems a long time, but it doesn't seem like four years since Beijing.

"Triathlon has a world series every year, so it's a bit of a conveyor belt, then there's the Commonwealth Games, which is very exciting.

"I'd love to be in Rio two years after that. We just need a course with a hill in Rio please."

The flat course played into the hands of Gomez, who has won in Hyde Park before and produced the best run of his career to deny the Brownlee family a one-two, with Alistair's younger brother Jonny finishing third.

The pair were helped on the bike leg by team-mate Stuart Hayes, who was controversially picked as a domestique, and Alistair Brownlee believes yesterday's race showed the strength of the approach.

He said: "Stu was absolutely brilliant. I think it shows the strength, not only of what you can do on race day when you're racing in a team, but the biggest thing, and what we never realised, was how good it's been over the last two months training as a team with the one goal in mind of two of us getting on the podium, and all three of us are immensely proud of that achievement."

PA

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