Athletics: Oscar Pistorius let off the hook before tussle with British blade runner

South African prepares for 100m battle with conqueror Oliveira as home hope Peacock hopes to ruffle a few feathers

Oscar Pistorius will escape punishment for his outburst in the aftermath of his shock defeat in the T43/44 200m final on Sunday. The International Paralympic Committee (IPC) said that they would not be sanctioning the South African following his post-race protest that the Brazilian winner Alan Oliveira had an unfair advantage because of his elongated blades. "There will be no disciplinary action," said Craig Spence, communications director of the IPC.

Pistorius will be back in action in the Olympic Stadium tonight, running in the heats of the T43/44 100m. In addition to Oliveira, who improved his personal best by 0.43sec to win the 200m in 21.45sec, the 25-year-old will also have to contend with the razor-sharp British Blade Runner Jonnie Peacock.

Indeed, Peacock happens to be the fastest amputee in history. Running as a guest at the US Paralympic Trials at the University of Indiana in June, the 19-year-old from Cambridge clocked a stunning 10.85sec for 100m. In doing so, he broke the world record for the T44 single amputee category, held by Marlon Shirley of the USA. His time was also 0.06sec quicker than the T43 double amputee world record held by Pistorius since 2007.

Peacock lost his right leg below the knee after contracting meningococcal septicaemia at the age of five. His speed was spotted at a talent identification day held by the British Paralympic Association at London's Mile End Stadium four years ago. For the past 12 months he has been training as a full-time athlete at the UK Athletics National Performance Centre at Lee Valley in north London, under the direction of Dan Pfaff.

Pfaff guided Canadian sprinter Donovan Bailey to Olympic 100m gold in Atlanta in 1996 and the American coach had a gold medal success at the 2012 Olympics in the shape of British long jumper Greg Rutherford. Peacock trains alongside Rutherford in an eclectic group that also includes pole vaulter Steve Lewis and javelin thrower Goldie Sayers.

"Jonnie is a very special talent," Rutherford said. "He is an amazing sprinter and I expect him to win at the Paralympics. The track in the Olympic Stadium is fast and I expect him to run around the 10.6secs mark or even faster.

"He expects to win as well and it's great to see someone who has that confidence in their ability. We give him a hard time, but he gets on well with the whole group. It is testament to Dan's hard work that he's doing so well. He's a really exciting prospect."

Peacock himself said: "It's a great group to be in. I do some work with Greg over 30m. He's very fast. It was absolutely brilliant when he won the Olympic final. I was so happy for him. He deserved it."

It was not the happiest of mornings on the track for Peacock's British team-mates yesterday.

Shelly Woods and Jade Jones both failed to qualify for the final of the women's T54 800m – to be held this evening.

Woods finished third in her heat in 1min 56.39sec and Jones was fifth in hers in 1:56.16. Woods, the two-time London Marathon winner from Lytham St Annes, admitted: "I just entered the 800m for some track time before the 1500m, so I wasn't really expecting to make the final. The 1500m and marathon are more my territory."

Similarly, the discus is more Bev Jones' territory than the shot, in which she placed seventh in the F37 final yesterday morning with a put of 9.85m. "I'm really looking forward to the discus," she said. "It's my main event and this has been a really good step up for that."

News
peoplePair enliven the Emirates bore-draw
Arts and Entertainment
tvPoldark episode 8, review
News
Britain's opposition Labour Party leader Ed Miliband (R) and Boris Johnson, mayor of London, talk on the Andrew Marr show in London April 26
General electionAndrew Marr forced to intervene as Boris and Miliband clash on TV
Arts and Entertainment
Ramsay Bolton in Game of Thrones
tvSeries 5, Episode 3 review
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Day In a Page

Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

How a costume drama became a Sunday night staple
Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers as he pushes Tories on housing

Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers

Labour leader pushes Tories on housing
Aviation history is littered with grand failures - from the the Bristol Brabazon to Concorde - but what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?

Aviation history is littered with grand failures

But what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?
Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of Soviet-style 'iron curtains' right across Europe

Fortress Europe?

Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of 'iron curtains'
Never mind what you're wearing, it's what you're reclining on

Never mind what you're wearing

It's what you're reclining on that matters
General Election 2015: Chuka Umunna on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband

Chuka Umunna: A virus of racism runs through Ukip

The shadow business secretary on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband
Yemen crisis: This exotic war will soon become Europe's problem

Yemen's exotic war will soon affect Europe

Terrorism and boatloads of desperate migrants will be the outcome of the Saudi air campaign, says Patrick Cockburn
Marginal Streets project aims to document voters in the run-up to the General Election

Marginal Streets project documents voters

Independent photographers Joseph Fox and Orlando Gili are uploading two portraits of constituents to their website for each day of the campaign
Game of Thrones: Visit the real-life kingdom of Westeros to see where violent history ends and telly tourism begins

The real-life kingdom of Westeros

Is there something a little uncomfortable about Game of Thrones shooting in Northern Ireland?
How to survive a social-media mauling, by the tough women of Twitter

How to survive a Twitter mauling

Mary Beard, Caroline Criado-Perez, Louise Mensch, Bunny La Roche and Courtney Barrasford reveal how to trounce the trolls
Gallipoli centenary: At dawn, the young remember the young who perished in one of the First World War's bloodiest battles

At dawn, the young remember the young

A century ago, soldiers of the Empire – many no more than boys – spilt on to Gallipoli’s beaches. On this 100th Anzac Day, there are personal, poetic tributes to their sacrifice
Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves

Follow the money as never before

Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves, reports Rupert Cornwell
Samuel West interview: The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents

Samuel West interview

The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents
General Election 2015: Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, on what the leaders' appearances tell us about them
Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

The architect of the HeForShe movement and head of UN Women on the world's failure to combat domestic violence