South African Paralympic team blade claim reignites Oscar Pistorius row

 

The Oscar Pistorius row was reignited today amid fresh allegations by the South African team that athletes were changing blades between races.

The International Paralympic Committee (IPC) received a letter yesterday morning claiming competitors had been breaking rules by altering prosthetic legs between qualifiers and finals.

Blades are measured between races and it is illegal under Paralympic rules to switch blades during a competition.

Pistorius sparked controversy with angry comments he made after losing out on gold in the 200 metres, claiming Alan Oliveira's use of longer blades gave him an unfair advantage.

Today Craig Spence from the IPC said: "When we put that allegation to the coaches there was a look of shock to be honest, because running on different size prostheses or swapping them for races is extremely difficult to do for an athlete.

"There is no evidence that any athlete competed on different size running blades.

"Unless the South Africans can come to us with some evidence that proves otherwise, it's something that we won't continue investigating."

Meanwhile Lord Coe, chairman of the London 2012 Organising Committee, today defended the decision to invite politicians to medal ceremonies. During this afternoon's Prime Minister's Questions, Labour leader Ed Miliband said of the cacophony of boos which greeted George Osborne: "The Paralympic crowd spoke for Britain."

But for ParalympicsGB, the gold medal joy continued unabated as super cyclist Sarah Storey, 34, won her third title of the games.

She added to her two gold medals won in the 500m time trial and pursuit in the velodrome by winning the road race time trial at Brands Hatch in Kent.

Another win tomorrow and the swimmer-turned-cyclist, who has a partly formed left hand, will equal Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson's British female record of 11 Paralympic gold medals.

Her hat-trick of golds comes as Olympic star Victoria Pendleton claims there is "no reason" why top Paralympians should not compete alongside Team GB in Rio de Janeiro.

She said gold medallist Sarah Storey had "proved" herself countless times.

David Weir, 33, who last night won an electrifying 1,500m final in the Olympic Stadium, could get his third win after comfortably qualifying for tomorrow's 800m final.

He will also take part in Sunday's marathon on London's streets, and is favourite to make it a clean sweep of quadruple golds.

Tour de France and Olympic star Bradley Wiggins last night hailed Paralympians - including Weir - as "amazing athletes".

British sprint favourite Jonnie Peacock, 19, will start his quest for glory at the Olympic Stadium later today when he lines up for his 100m heat.

Peacock, from Cambridge, contracted meningitis as a child which left him in a coma, and doctors were forced to amputate his right leg below the knee.

He is already the fastest amputee in the world after setting the quickest ever time of 10.85 seconds in June.

Also appearing in a separate qualifier will be Pistorius.

The games gets physical today as wheelchair rugby - also known as murderball - gets under way as Britain takes on the United States.

The sport is so brutal that welders are on hand at the side of the pitch to patch up the battered equipment - which is pummelled during the incredibly physical matches.

Britain will take on the United States in the basketball arena this afternoon.

"The Quadfather" Peter Norfolk, 51, also bids to get his medal attempt back on track later as he takes part in the wheelchair tennis mens doubles with his partner Andy Lapthorne, after he suffered a shock defeat in the singles yesterday.

PA

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
News
peopleMathematician John Nash inspired the film Beautiful Mind
News
Richard Blair is concerned the trenches are falling into disrepair
newsGeorge Orwell's son wants to save war site that inspired book
Life and Style
Audrey Hepburn with Hubert De Givenchy, whose well-cut black tuxedo is a 'timeless look'
fashionIt may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
Arts and Entertainment
The pair in their heyday in 1967
music
Life and Style
fashionFrom bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Day In a Page

Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine