Ugo Monye signs new Quins deal

 


England wing Ugo Monye has signed a new contract with Harlequins, tying him to the Aviva Premiership club until the summer of 2015.

The 28-year-old is understood to have attracted interest from around the world, but has committed his future to Quins, the club he joined straight from school.

Monye's decision to remain in the Premiership also signals his desire to fight his way back into the England team, having narrowly missed out on the World Cup squad.

Monye said: "Being at Harlequins is not all about the playing, it becomes a part of your life.

"We are a tight-knit bunch of lads who all love playing for each other. With so many English qualified players within the squad we all have a common goal - playing for Quins and our country."

Monye started two Tests for the Lions in 2009 but won the last of his 13 England caps in the 2010 Six Nations, since when he has been overtaken by Chris Ashton.

Monye would have been ineligible for international selection if he had moved abroad, and Quins director of rugby Conor O'Shea believes his decision to stay is a statement of intent to whoever becomes England head coach.

"By signing this contract he is not only committing to us and what he believes we can achieve in the coming years, he is also setting his stall out to be part of the World Cup squad in 2015," O'Shea said.

"We are delighted, as I am sure every single supporter of Harlequins will be with this news."

Monye was offered a lucrative move to Racing Metro in 2010 but turned it down because he felt he still had more to achieve with Harlequins.

Having been through relegation and 'Bloodgate', Harlequins are now back on track.

They won the Amlin Challenge Cup last season and are unbeaten so far this campaign.

Monye is proud of being a one-club man and is excited by what the future holds at The Stoop.

"I have so many wonderful memories here at Quins, but what I think I am most proud about is the way the club has bounced back from adversity - Bloodgate and relegation -both of these negatives have seen us become stronger," Monye added.

"Of course, reaching the semi-finals of the Premiership in 2009 and, more recently, the wins against Munster and Stade Francais in the Amlin Challenge Cup, are moments I will treasure, along with making my debut for England and the Lions.

"I am so proud to be a part of this club and I am looking forward to extending my time here by at least another three years.

"It has been fantastic to have been a witness to all the changes that have taken place at the club over the last 10 years.

"Colin Osborne and Tony Diprose have created an academy that has produced a number of the current first team squad and, I am sure, many more England internationals in the future.

"The stadium and fan base has grown and the success of the Big Game has shown Quins to be at the forefront of the development of rugby in this country.

"We are a forward thinking club and that is another reason why I want to be here."

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