Tennis: Wimbledon snub women

THE PRIZE-MONEY for Wimbledon (21 June to 4 July) will total a record pounds 7,595,330, an increase of 5.4 per cent, with the women players falling pounds 720,770 short in their campaign for parity with the men. Whether this would make a suffragette's heart bleed is open to question.

Women competitors, whose matches are decided over the best of three sets, will receive pounds 3,098,000 (a 6.2 per cent increase). The men, who play best- of-five-sets, will be paid pounds 3,819,670 (a 4.9 per cent raise). The men's singles champion will get pounds 45,500 more than his female counterpart: pounds 455,000 against pounds 409,500.

Announcing the figures yesterday, John Curry, due to retire as the All England Club's chairman this year, pre-empted criticism from the Women's Tennis Association. "We've had representations from the WTA, and there's supposed to be a petition signed by 90 players, which we've heard about but haven't seen, in which they say they deserve and demand equal prize money at the Grand Slams," Curry said.

"I'm sure what we've done will not meet that need, but it seems strange they're demanding 100 per cent prize money in these tournaments but they [the WTA Tour] pay 50 per cent less prize-money [to women] than is paid [to men] in ATP Tour tournaments.

"Seventy per cent of people say they want to watch men's singles. It's not commercially reasonable to be demanding equal prize-money. They have every right to request increases, but to demand them is hurtful to the championships. I don't think the players are that concerned. Prize-money is a small proportion of their income."

Curry's views contradict Billie Jean King, winner of a record 20 Wimbledon titles (singles, doubles, mixed doubles), a prime force in the development of women's professional tennis, and captain of the United States Fed Cup team. "I think the women today are the best we've ever been, and this is their window of opportunity, to ask for what they want. And I think they could get it," King said recently.

When tennis went open in 1968, King received pounds 750 for winning the Wimbledon women's singles title. Rod Laver, the men's singles champion, was paid pounds 2,000. This year, first round losers in the qualifying tournament for the Wimbledon women's singles will receive pounds 840 (first round losers in the men's singles qualifying event get pounds 1,080). In 1968, a place in the quarter-finals of the Wimbledon women's singles was worth pounds 150, the sum all competitors this year will receive as a daily allowance to help with the cost of accommodation and travel.

Leaps in the amount of prize-money - pounds 26,150 in 1968; pounds 277,066 in 1979; pounds 3.133m in 1989 - have been matched by pre-tax profits, which are passed on to the Lawn Tennis Association for the development of the sport. Last year's profit was pounds 33m.

The total prize-money for the next Grand Slam tournament, the French Open (24 May to 6 June) will be pounds 6.8m.

Suggested Topics
PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Recruitment Resourcer

£18000 - £22000 Per Annum: Clearwater People Solutions Ltd: Recruitment Resour...

Account Manager (Junior)

Negotiable: Clearwater People Solutions Ltd: Account Manager (Junior) Account ...

Javascript Developer

£40000 - £60000 per annum + competitive: Progressive Recruitment: My client, a...

Solar Business Development Manager – M&A

£50000 - £60000 Per Annum: The Green Recruitment Company: The Green Recruitmen...

Day In a Page

A new Russian revolution: Cracks start to appear in Putin’s Kremlin power bloc

A new Russian revolution

Cracks start to appear in Putin’s Kremlin power bloc
Eugene de Kock: Apartheid’s sadistic killer that his country cannot forgive

Apartheid’s sadistic killer that his country cannot forgive

The debate rages in South Africa over whether Eugene de Kock should ever be released from jail
Standing my ground: If sitting is bad for your health, what happens when you stay on your feet for a whole month?

Standing my ground

If sitting is bad for your health, what happens when you stay on your feet for a whole month?
Commonwealth Games 2014: Dai Greene prays for chance to rebuild after injury agony

Greene prays for chance to rebuild after injury agony

Welsh hurdler was World, European and Commonwealth champion, but then the injuries crept in
Israel-Gaza conflict: Secret report helps Israelis to hide facts

Patrick Cockburn: Secret report helps Israel to hide facts

The slickness of Israel's spokesmen is rooted in directions set down by pollster Frank Luntz
The man who dared to go on holiday

The man who dared to go on holiday

New York's mayor has taken a vacation - in a nation that has still to enforce paid leave, it caused quite a stir, reports Rupert Cornwell
Best comedians: How the professionals go about their funny business, from Sarah Millican to Marcus Brigstocke

Best comedians: How the professionals go about their funny business

For all those wanting to know how stand-ups keep standing, here are some of the best moments
The Guest List 2014: Forget the Man Booker longlist, Literary Editor Katy Guest offers her alternative picks

The Guest List 2014

Forget the Man Booker longlist, Literary Editor Katy Guest offers her alternative picks
Jokes on Hollywood: 'With comedy film audiences shrinking, it’s time to move on'

Jokes on Hollywood

With comedy film audiences shrinking, it’s time to move on
It's the best of British art... but not all is on display

It's the best of British art... but not all is on display

Voted for by the British public, the artworks on Art Everywhere posters may be the only place where they can be seen
Critic claims 'I was the inspiration for Blanche DuBois'

Critic claims 'I was the inspiration for Blanche DuBois'

Blanche Marvin reveals how Tennessee Williams used her name and an off-the-cuff remark to create an iconic character
Sometimes it's hard to be a literary novelist

Sometimes it's hard to be a literary novelist

Websites offering your ebooks for nothing is only the latest disrespect the modern writer is subjected to, says DJ Taylor
Edinburgh Fringe 2014: The comedy highlights, from Bridget Christie to Jack Dee

Edinburgh Fringe 2014

The comedy highlights, from Bridget Christie to Jack Dee
Dame Jenny Abramsky: 'We have to rethink. If not, museums and parks will close'

Dame Jenny Abramsky: 'We have to rethink. If not, museums and parks will close'

The woman stepping down as chair of the Heritage Lottery Fund is worried