Australian Open 2014: Jamie Murray blames heatstroke on oversleeping which hampered preparations for doubles match

Murray required several hours treatment following the first round victory after playing in extreme temperatures of over 40C

Jamie Murray believes a missed alarm call led to him suffering heatstroke at the Australian Open.

The Scot required several hours of treatment following his first-round doubles match with Australian partner John Peers on Thursday.

Murray revealed he did not prepare properly for the match, which was played in temperatures in excess of 40C, because he overslept for an hour and a half.

He said: "My alarm didn't go off so I slept in about an hour and a half later than what I should have. I was only woken up because the driver called the room to see where I was.

"That was 8.30am and we were supposed to practise at 9am, then the match was 11am. I was kind of rushing around, I didn't get time to have breakfast and all that stuff, so it wasn't an ideal start.

"I'm sure I would have been okay if I hadn't had the start to the day that I had. I know the risks you take by going out in that heat and not being fully prepared. I didn't choose to do it that way, it's just what happened."

Describing his ordeal, he said: "I started feeling bad after the match and when I got back into the changing rooms I felt light-headed.

"I just wanted to lie down and then I started to cramp in my legs, which was a bit worrying for me because I'd never had it that bad before.

"The doctors and the physios were putting ice over me, so then I was shivering for a long time. I was on the floor in the locker room. I didn't want to move.

"Finally the physio said I needed to get up and walk around, and after I got up I felt a lot better straight away.

"I still felt rough for a while, I couldn't really sit down. I was walking around the grounds for a couple of hours because every time I sat down I started getting really light-headed. But in the evening I felt a lot better and once I slept I was fine.

"It was a bit scary but I'm here today and you would never know it had happened."

Murray was far from the only player to struggle in the conditions, which were branded "inhumane" by Canada's Frank Dancevic after he blacked out on court.

The extreme heat policy, which sees matches either suspended or played under a roof, was implemented only once despite the thermometer reading 40C on four successive days.

Murray, brother of world number four Andy Murray, was reluctant to comment on the rights or wrongs of the decision-making, saying with a wry smile: "It's above my pay grade really.

"They've obviously got to decide and that day after we finished they thought it was too hot to play. I don't think too many people would have complained if they'd stopped the previous days."

Murray insisted he had recovered fully for his second-round match on Saturday, but he and Peers were beaten 6-4 6-4 by America's Eric Butorac and Raven Klaasen of South Africa.

The British-Australian pair of Murray and Peers had an excellent 2013 and went close to qualifying for the ATP World Tour Finals in London despite only playing together in two Masters Series events.

They are now ranked highly enough to get into all the big events, and being among the top eight teams in the world at the O2 Arena in November is a big goal.

"We were only a couple of matches short at the end so we'll keep working hard, working together and trying to make the team stronger," said Murray.

"Because we can play in the bigger tournaments now, there's more points available, so hopefully that will stand us in good stead. But obviously the players are stronger as well so we'll have to play well to win matches."

PA

Caption competition
Caption competition
  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

The saffron censorship that governs India: Why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression

The saffron censorship that governs India

Zareer Masani reveals why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression
Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Supreme Court rules Dominic Grieve's ministerial veto was invalid
Distressed Zayn Malik fans are cutting themselves - how did fandom get so dark?

How did fandom get so dark?

Grief over Zayn Malik's exit from One Direction seemed amusing until stories of mass 'cutting' emerged. Experts tell Gillian Orr the distress is real, and the girls need support
The galaxy collisions that shed light on unseen parallel Universe

The cosmic collisions that have shed light on unseen parallel Universe

Dark matter study gives scientists insight into mystery of space
The Swedes are adding a gender-neutral pronoun to their dictionary

Swedes introduce gender-neutral pronoun

Why, asks Simon Usborne, must English still struggle awkwardly with the likes of 's/he' and 'they'?
Disney's mega money-making formula: 'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan

Disney's mega money-making formula

'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan
Lobster has gone mainstream with supermarket bargains for £10 or less - but is it any good?

Lobster has gone mainstream

Anthea Gerrie, raised on meaty specimens from the waters around Maine, reveals how to cook up an affordable feast
Easter 2015: 14 best decorations

14 best Easter decorations

Get into the Easter spirit with our pick of accessories, ornaments and tableware
Paul Scholes column: Gareth Bale would be a perfect fit at Manchester United and could turn them into serious title contenders next season

Paul Scholes column

Gareth Bale would be a perfect fit at Manchester United and could turn them into serious title contenders next season
Inside the Kansas greenhouses where Monsanto is 'playing God' with the future of the planet

The future of GM

The greenhouses where Monsanto 'plays God' with the future of the planet
Britain's mild winters could be numbered: why global warming is leaving UK chillier

Britain's mild winters could be numbered

Gulf Stream is slowing down faster than ever, scientists say
Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Donation brings total raised by Homeless Veterans campaign to at least £1.25m
Oh dear, the most borrowed book at Bank of England library doesn't inspire confidence

The most borrowed book at Bank of England library? Oh dear

The book's fifth edition is used for Edexcel exams
Cowslips vs honeysuckle: The hunt for the UK’s favourite wildflower

Cowslips vs honeysuckle

It's the hunt for UK’s favourite wildflower
Child abuse scandal: Did a botched blackmail attempt by South African intelligence help Cyril Smith escape justice?

Did a botched blackmail attempt help Cyril Smith escape justice?

A fresh twist reveals the Liberal MP was targeted by the notorious South African intelligence agency Boss