French Open: Roger Federer immediately turns attention to Wimbledon after humbling by Jo-Wilfried Tsonga

Federer lost prior to the semi-final stage in Paris for only the second time since 2004

Roger Federer will seek solace in the grass courts after a humbling defeat by Jo-Wilfried Tsonga at the French Open.

It was expected to be a close match but Tsonga dominated to win 7-5 6-3 6-3 and reach his first semi-final at Roland Garros.

Federer lost prior to the semi-final stage in Paris for only the second time since 2004, and he will now begin preparing for next week's grass tournament in Halle and the defence of his Wimbledon title.

The 31-year-old made no attempt to sugar-coat the defeat, admitting he was well beaten and making plain the disappointment that he could not raise his game to a better level.

He said: "I know some people say I only care about how I play and not about the result. I mean, I care more about the result than how I played, to be honest, because it gives me another opportunity to play well in the next match.

"I didn't do that, so I'm sent packing home. Which is okay. It's easier when you change surface. That definitely helps.

"This is obviously a crushing loss and I'm disappointed about it, but now I look forward to other things. I love the grass-court season.

"Especially as it's been 10 years since my first Wimbledon victory. So I'm looking forward to coming back to Halle and Wimbledon, where I did the double 10 years ago. I'm sure it's going to be a nice swing."

Tsonga kept alive France's hopes of a home victory 30 years after Yannick Noah became the last Frenchman to lift the Coupe des Mousquetaires.

There are reports Noah will present the trophy to the winner on Sunday, and Tsonga revealed the former champion is a big influence.

"When he sings, I dance," said the 28-year-old, who plays fourth seed David Ferrer in the last four.

"That's my relationship. When he says something to me, I listen to him. I like him very much."

In the women's draw, there was a first scare for world number one Serena Williams, who fought back from a break down in the decider to beat Svetlana Kuznetsova 6-1 3-6 6-3.

Remarkably given her success elsewhere, it is the first time Williams has reached the last four in Paris in a decade.

She has lost four times in the quarter-finals in the intervening period, including to Kuznetsova in 2009, and she said: "I just got tired of losing in the quarters. It's enough."

Williams will meet Sara Errani next after the Italian, last year's runner-up, clinched her first victory over a top-five opponent by knocking out fourth seed Agnieszka Radwanska.

Today, Novak Djokovic and Rafael Nadal will attempt to set up a blockbuster semi-final when they meet Tommy Haas and Stanislas Wawrinka, respectively, while Maria Sharapova plays Jelena Jankovic and Victoria Azarenka faces Maria Kirilenko.

PA

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