Hingis breezes past Dokic

World number one Martina Hingis cruised past Jelena Dokic in straight sets in the second round of the Swisscom Challenge in Zurich today, redressing her humbling Wimbledon loss to the Australian when they last clashed.

World number one Martina Hingis cruised past Jelena Dokic in straight sets in the second round of the Swisscom Challenge in Zurich today, redressing her humbling Wimbledon loss to the Australian when they last clashed.

A clinical Hingis took 51 minutes to dispatch the Australian 6-3, 6-2, erasing unpleasant memories of her 1999 first-round Wimbledon defeat to Dokic, then ranked 129th in the world, in what was considered the biggest upset in Open era history.

"It was good it didn't happen again today," said Hingis, fresh off her singles and doubles triumph in Filderstadt on Sunday. "I was maybe a bit more nervous playing her than against some of the other players.

"I see her at Grand Slams and other tournaments, but I felt confident to play my game and thought nothing should stop me, I still have something to rely on to get out of this silly situation."

It marked the first time the two players have met outside a Grand Slam, Hingis having defeated Dokic in straight sets at the Australian Open prior to her embarrassing Wimbledon defeat.

Hingis broke the Australian early in the opening set to go 3-1, with Dokic unable to regain her serve.

The two traded breaks early in the second set, but Hingis, hot on serve, broke again to take a 3-2 lead and once more to go 5-2.

Dokic, who lost the Olympic bronze medal match in Sydney to American Monica Seles and reached the quarterfinals in Tokyo last week before being beaten by Serena Williams, was clearly no match for Hingis, whose scorching serve throughout the match resulted in six aces.

"I don't think I attacked enough, that was the difference this time," said Dokic. "I let her stay in the points and you can't do that with her.

"I should have concentrated more on my own shots than on what she was doing and I could have attacked her second serve more. I just wasn't out there."

A fresh Hingis, who chose not to play at the Olympics, is still looking for a first career tournament title on home soil, her 32 titles all coming outside Switzerland. The Swiss player will meet either Russian qualifier Anastasia Myskina or eighth-seeded Elena Dementieva in the quarterfinals.

In first round action earlier in the day, a sullen Jennifer Capriati scraped past wildcard Lina Krasnoroutskaya 5-7, 6-3, 7-6 (6), in a volatile match that had the American refusing to shake hands with her 16-year-old Russian opponent, accusing her of unsporting tactics.

"I've been playing 10 years and never thought I would ever do anything like that," said Capriati, who won her ninth career tournament title in Luxembourg two weeks ago. "Until now, someone has never driven me to that point. Her behavior on the court was unprofessional. It was a lot of things.

"I have shoulder problems and she would keep saying 'come on, go,' even after the points ... it was disrespectful on her part. Then she was stalling on my serve and the umpire thought I was right and gave her warnings."

The American started strongly, breaking Krasnoroutskaya twice to jump to a 4-1 lead. But the Russian stormed back, winning the next seven of eight games to take the first set and lead the second 1-0.

But Capriati fought back, breaking to go 3-2 and then once more to close out the set.

In a roller coaster final set, the Russian looked to have the match in the pocket, breaking Capriati twice to jump to a 4-1 lead. But unwilling to go out meekly, Capriati rallied back, beginning a back-and-forth struggle which saw the pair exchange breaks five times in a row, sending the decisive set into a tie-break.

In the end it was Capriati who prevailed, with a crumbling Krasnoroutskaya squandering four match points.

In other matches, Bulgaria's Magdalena Maleeva defeated Dominique Van Roost of Belgium 6-7 (5), 6-2, 7-6 (4), while Austrian Barbara Schett ousted Russia's Elena Likhovtseva 6-0, 6-1.

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