Marin Cilic pulls out of Montreal Masters after claims of failed drug test

Croat does about-turn on playing to increase speculation that he will soon be banned

Marin Cilic has pulled out of next week's Montreal Masters, his second withdrawal from a tournament since unconfirmed reports emerged claiming that the world No 15 had failed a drugs test. Cilic had been announced as one of the seeds for Montreal, where most of the world's leading men will be competing, but the tournament have announced that the 24-year-old Croatian would not be taking part.

Cilic has not played anywhere since Wimbledon, where he withdrew before his second-round match against Kenny de Schepper. Local media claimed last month that Cilic had been informed at Wimbledon that he had failed a drugs test at the Munich Open in April. It was reported that his 'incautious use of glucose' had resulted in the positive test, though glucose is not a banned substance.

Cilic's management company failed to respond to a request for information about when he might return, while the International Tennis Federation, which administers the drug-testing programme, refused to comment on whether or not the 2012 Queen's Club champion had failed a drugs test. The ITF follows a strict policy of releasing information on such matters only if tribunals find players guilty of offences.

In serious cases the ITF can impose a provisional (but not publicised) suspension after a failed drugs test, but it is often up to the player to decide whether or not he or she wants to compete pending a tribunal. If Cilic has failed a test he might have decided not to play in the interim.

It usually takes about three months for a player to come before a tribunal following a positive test, which could mean a Cilic hearing is imminent. There had been speculation in Croatia that he might be handed a three-month retrospective ban, which could have explained why he would have returned in Montreal. Ranking points and prize money earned during retrospective bans are withdrawn and a three-month suspension might have ended before the start of the Montreal tournament.

Anything longer than a three-month ban would have serious consequences for next month's Davis Cup World Group play-off between Croatia and Britain in Umag. Cilic is Croatia's best player and would represent the country's main hopes of beating Britain, especially if Andy Murray lives up to his commitment to play for Leon Smith's team. However, he cited a knee injury for pulling out of Wimbledon and last month's clay-court tournament in Umag in his native Croatia and has never admitted to failing a drug test.

Meanwhile the ITF is still waiting to hear whether Serbia's Viktor Troicki has appealed against the 18-month suspension imposed last month for failing to provide a blood sample at a tournament earlier this year. Troicki, who insisted that a doping control officer had told him he could miss a drugs test after he complained of feeling unwell, said after his hearing he would take his case to the Court of Arbitration for Sport.

Following criticism that drug-testing procedures in tennis are not strict enough, the ITF is in the process of establishing a system of "biological passports". It is expected to be in place by the end of the year.

BUY WIMBLEDON TICKETS

Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Daily Quiz
SPONSORED FEATURES
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent
Markus Persson: If being that rich is so bad, why not just give it all away?

That's a bit rich

The billionaire inventor of computer game Minecraft says he is bored, lonely and isolated by his vast wealth. If it’s that bad, says Simon Kelner, why not just give it all away?
Euro 2016: Chris Coleman on course to end half a century of hurt for Wales

Coleman on course to end half a century of hurt for Wales

Wales last qualified for major tournament in 1958 but after several near misses the current crop can book place at Euro 2016 and end all the indifference
Rugby World Cup 2015: The tournament's forgotten XV

Forgotten XV of the rugby World Cup

Now the squads are out, Chris Hewett picks a side of stars who missed the cut
A groundbreaking study of 'Britain's Atlantis' long buried at the bottom of the North Sea could revolutionise how we see our prehistoric past

Britain's Atlantis

Scientific study beneath North Sea could revolutionise how we see the past
The Queen has 'done and said nothing that anybody will remember,' says Starkey

The Queen has 'done and said nothing that anybody will remember'

David Starkey's assessment
Oliver Sacks said his life has been 'an enormous privilege and adventure'

'An enormous privilege and adventure'

Oliver Sacks writing about his life
'Gibraltar is British, and it is going to stay British forever'

'Gibraltar is British, and it is going to stay British forever'

The Rock's Chief Minister hits back at Spanish government's 'lies'
Britain is still addicted to 'dirty coal'

Britain still addicted to 'dirty' coal

Biggest energy suppliers are more dependent on fossil fuel than a decade ago
Orthorexia nervosa: How becoming obsessed with healthy eating can lead to malnutrition

Orthorexia nervosa

How becoming obsessed with healthy eating can lead to malnutrition
Lady Chatterley is not obscene, says TV director

Lady Chatterley’s Lover

Director Jed Mercurio on why DH Lawrence's novel 'is not an obscene story'
Farmers in tropical forests are training ants to kill off bigger pests

Set a pest to catch a pest

Farmers in tropical forests are training ants to kill off bigger pests