Murray: Henman can help me

As he continues his search for a new coach, Andy Murray is considering an approach to Tim Henman. While Murray realises there is little chance that Henman would be interested in going into coaching at this stage of his life, he says the former British No 1 is someone "I would be interested in working with".

Murray is looking for a new coach after splitting with Alex Corretja, who had worked with him on a part-time basis for the last three years and had become the senior figure in the world No 4's camp following the departure of Miles Maclagan last summer. Until he finds a permanent replacement, Murray will work with some of Adidas' team of coaches, which includes Darren Cahill and Sven Groeneveld.

As for Henman, Murray said he had not talked to him yet. "I might speak to Tim," the 23-year-old Scot said. "He's someone who is around and as an ex-player I'm sure he could help me. I've a lot of respect for him, though I think he's quite happy on the golf course, to be honest."

Murray talked about his coaching situation at the announcement of his entry into the pre-Wimbledon Aegon Championships at Queen's Club in June. Considering Henman's outstanding record on grass, it would be no surprise if Murray sought out the former world No 4 in the two weeks he will have to prepare for the All England Club following the conclusion of the clay-court season. Henman had an outstanding record at Wimbledon, reaching the semi-finals four times and the quarter-finals on four other occasions.

Considering that there are very few established coaches available, did Murray think he might have to wait until after Wimbledon before making an appointment? "I'd like it to happen before then, but also I wouldn't like to employ someone two days before the French Open," he said. "If it doesn't happen in the next two or three weeks, it's more likely that it would happen straight after the French or after Wimbledon."

Murray said that the arrangement with Corretja, a former world No 2, had failed because of its part-time nature. "He wasn't in Australia and that's where I feel that relationship maybe broke down a little bit," he said. "We still get on really well as friends, but if someone's going to be controlling what's going on, you need to have them around at the big events."

Murray now concentrates on the European clay-court season, which begins at Monte Carlo this week. After losing all four matches since the Australian Open, the Scot needs to get his season back on track. He had planned to miss Monte Carlo but has accepted a wild card. The third seed has been given an opening-round bye but will face a former top-10 player in round two – the winner of Radek Stepanek against Marcos Baghdatis.

BUY WIMBLEDON TICKETS

Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

The Greek referendum exposes a gaping hole at the heart of the European Union – its distinct lack of any genuine popular legitimacy

Gaping hole at the heart of the European Union

Treatment of Greece has shown up a lack of genuine legitimacy
Number of young homeless in Britain 'more than three times the official figures'

'Everything changed when I went to the hostel'

Number of young homeless people in Britain is 'more than three times the official figures'
Compton Cricket Club

Compton Cricket Club

Portraits of LA cricketers from notorious suburb to be displayed in London
London now the global money-laundering centre for the drug trade, says crime expert

Wlecome to London, drug money-laundering centre for the world

'Mexico is its heart and London is its head'
The Buddhist temple minutes from Centre Court that helps a winner keep on winning

The Buddhist temple minutes from Centre Court

It helps a winner keep on winning
Is this the future of flying: battery-powered planes made of plastic, and without flight decks?

Is this the future of flying?

Battery-powered planes made of plastic, and without flight decks
Isis are barbarians – but the Caliphate is a dream at the heart of all Muslim traditions

Isis are barbarians

but the Caliphate is an ancient Muslim ideal
The Brink's-Mat curse strikes again: three tons of stolen gold that brought only grief

Curse of Brink's Mat strikes again

Death of John 'Goldfinger' Palmer the latest killing related to 1983 heist
Greece debt crisis: 'The ministers talk to us about miracles' – why Greeks are cynical ahead of the bailout referendum

'The ministers talk to us about miracles'

Why Greeks are cynical ahead of the bailout referendum
Call of the wild: How science is learning to decode the way animals communicate

Call of the wild

How science is learning to decode the way animals communicate
Greece debt crisis: What happened to democracy when it’s a case of 'Vote Yes or else'?

'The economic collapse has happened. What is at risk now is democracy...'

If it doesn’t work in Europe, how is it supposed to work in India or the Middle East, asks Robert Fisk
The science of swearing: What lies behind the use of four-letter words?

The science of swearing

What lies behind the use of four-letter words?
The Real Stories of Migrant Britain: Clive fled from Zimbabwe - now it won't have him back

The Real Stories of Migrant Britain

Clive fled from Zimbabwe - now it won’t have him back
Africa on the menu: Three foodie friends want to popularise dishes from the continent

Africa on the menu

Three foodie friends want to popularise dishes from the hot new continent
Donna Karan is stepping down after 30 years - so who will fill the DKNY creator's boots?

Who will fill Donna Karan's boots?

The designer is stepping down as Chief Designer of DKNY after 30 years. Alexander Fury looks back at the career of 'America's Chanel'