Murray: 'I was not expecting that but I don't want to stop there'

When Andy Murray set out on his Wimbledon campaign last week he refused to look beyond his first-round match against Nicolas Massu, the Olympic champion.

The British No 2 will still take one match at a time, starting with his fourth-round encounter this afternoon with Marcos Baghdatis, but after his thrilling victory here on Saturday night over Andy Roddick he could be forgiven for starting to think about the challenges that could lie ahead.

"If I play like I did against Roddick, I think I have a good chance of winning my next match," said Murray, who would probably face Lleyton Hewitt in the quarter-finals and Rafael Nadal in the semi-finals if he were to make further progress. Roger Federer is in the other half of the draw.

Firstly, however, Murray has to beat a player who has already played in the final of a Grand Slam tournament. Baghdatis, 21, lost to Federer in the Australian Open final in January.

"Baggy" left his family home in Limassol at 13 to train at a tennis academy in Paris. He was the world junior No 1 in 2003 and became the first Cypriot to reach the world's top 100 and play in a Grand Slam tournament. His breakthrough came in January in Melbourne, where thousands of boisterous flag-waving fans from the sizeable local Greek community came out to support him as he beat three top 10 players en route to the Australian final.

Following Melbourne, however, he had reached only one quarter-final until he found his feet on grass by making the semi-finals in Rosmalen last week. He has followed that with victories here over Britain's Alan Mackin, Romania's Andrei Pavel and France's Sebastien Grosjean.

"For the last six months I haven't believed in myself," Baghdatis said as he looked forward to facing Murray. "I've had so many doubts in my head, saying: 'Come on, all the matches are tough, no matches are easy, everybody's going on the court wanting to beat me.' It's been hard. But I think today the feeling of being in the second week of another Grand Slam gives me more confidence. It's a positive thing.

"It will be fun to play on Centre Court, though playing against a British player at Wimbledon will be tough. It's a new experience for me, but I'll just go on the court and try and find a way to win. Andy can do everything. He's a great player. He can defend, he can attack, he can do lots of things on the court."

Murray, who is good friends with Baghdatis, believes the Cypriot's game is suited to grass and that his opponent has the edge in experience. "I'm two years younger than Marcos, so physically he's a bit stronger as well," Murray said.

However, the manner of Murray's win over Roddick, whom he had already beaten in San Jose earlier this year, showed how much the Scot enjoys the challenge of playing high-pressure matches on the biggest stages.

"I've beaten the second best player on grass in the world and I've beaten him in the third round of a Grand Slam on one of the biggest courts in the world," Murray said. "It's one thing beating him in San Jose. It's different doing it here in a big tournament.

"It's huge to beat a guy who's been in the final twice here. If Federer wasn't around, Roddick probably would have won here. To win in straight sets is obviously special for me. I definitely wasn't expecting that. But I don't want to stop there.

"I know now that I can beat the best players in the world. It's more about doing it week in, week out, which might not happen this year, might not happen next year, but come 21 or 22 that's when I want to be doing that. That's when I've got a real chance of winning a Grand Slam tournament."

Murray is playing the best tennis of his life despite having been without a coach since parting with Mark Petchey nearly three months ago. His team and the Lawn Tennis Association are currently in talks with Brad Gilbert, the former coach of Roddick and Andre Agassi.

"When I was younger, all the coaches used to say that my main strength was being able to work out how to beat opponents, how to play on their weaknesses and play to my strengths, and get the match to go the way that I wanted it to go," Murray said.

"Maybe after being at the academy in Spain for a while and having quite a few different coaches over a short space of time I was listening to the coaches a lot and maybe not thinking enough for myself.

"This week I've really done that. I'm pretty chuffed because everyone was saying I needed a coach for the grass-court season. I definitely need a coach, but I would much rather be on my own than have the wrong coach."

Caption competition
Caption competition
  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

The saffron censorship that governs India: Why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression

The saffron censorship that governs India

Zareer Masani reveals why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression
Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Supreme Court rules Dominic Grieve's ministerial veto was invalid
Distressed Zayn Malik fans are cutting themselves - how did fandom get so dark?

How did fandom get so dark?

Grief over Zayn Malik's exit from One Direction seemed amusing until stories of mass 'cutting' emerged. Experts tell Gillian Orr the distress is real, and the girls need support
The galaxy collisions that shed light on unseen parallel Universe

The cosmic collisions that have shed light on unseen parallel Universe

Dark matter study gives scientists insight into mystery of space
The Swedes are adding a gender-neutral pronoun to their dictionary

Swedes introduce gender-neutral pronoun

Why, asks Simon Usborne, must English still struggle awkwardly with the likes of 's/he' and 'they'?
Disney's mega money-making formula: 'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan

Disney's mega money-making formula

'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan
Lobster has gone mainstream with supermarket bargains for £10 or less - but is it any good?

Lobster has gone mainstream

Anthea Gerrie, raised on meaty specimens from the waters around Maine, reveals how to cook up an affordable feast
Easter 2015: 14 best decorations

14 best Easter decorations

Get into the Easter spirit with our pick of accessories, ornaments and tableware
Paul Scholes column: Gareth Bale would be a perfect fit at Manchester United and could turn them into serious title contenders next season

Paul Scholes column

Gareth Bale would be a perfect fit at Manchester United and could turn them into serious title contenders next season
Inside the Kansas greenhouses where Monsanto is 'playing God' with the future of the planet

The future of GM

The greenhouses where Monsanto 'plays God' with the future of the planet
Britain's mild winters could be numbered: why global warming is leaving UK chillier

Britain's mild winters could be numbered

Gulf Stream is slowing down faster than ever, scientists say
Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Donation brings total raised by Homeless Veterans campaign to at least £1.25m
Oh dear, the most borrowed book at Bank of England library doesn't inspire confidence

The most borrowed book at Bank of England library? Oh dear

The book's fifth edition is used for Edexcel exams
Cowslips vs honeysuckle: The hunt for the UK’s favourite wildflower

Cowslips vs honeysuckle

It's the hunt for UK’s favourite wildflower
Child abuse scandal: Did a botched blackmail attempt by South African intelligence help Cyril Smith escape justice?

Did a botched blackmail attempt help Cyril Smith escape justice?

A fresh twist reveals the Liberal MP was targeted by the notorious South African intelligence agency Boss