Navratilova's last SW19 hurrah

Martina Navratilova, playing at what she confirmed last night will be her last ever Wimbledon, rounded off a good day for the senior citizens of the circuit by advancing to the quarter-finals of the women's doubles to keep alive her dream of becoming the most prolific title-winner in Wimbledon history.

The 49-year-old Czech-born American, partnered by South Africa's Liezel Huber, advanced in straight sets past Russian pair Elena Likhovtseva and Anastasia Myskina, 7-5, 6-0. Navratilova holds 20 titles, including nine in the women's singles. This puts her level with Billie Jean King, who won six singles titles and 14 in the doubles events. Navratilova is also still in the mixed doubles here, having progressed to the third round so far.

Navratilova suggested last week that this could be her last appearance. Asked last night if she had made a firm decision, she said: "Yeah. I think it's time. It's time. It's enough - I just want to move on to my next life, spend more time with my one and only, my animals, devote more time to my businesses."

Jonas Bjorkman was the hardy perennial in the men's game. While seven of today's men's singles quarter-finalists were putting their feet up or hitting a few gentle practice balls yesterday, the oldest man in the last eight by a margin was grafting on court until after 4.30pm. Bjorkman is 34, making him six and a half years older than the next oldest man remaining - today's opponent, Radek Stepanek, 27 - and 14 years older than the whippersnapper in the pack, Rafael Nadal, 20.

Yet instead of relaxing ahead of his biggest Grand Slam singles match for nine years, the Swede was competing in the men's doubles. To add spice, his partner was Belarus's Max Mirnyi, whom he beat in five sets in the singles on Monday. The spice evidently helped. He and Mirnyi advanced to the doubles quarter-finals by beating Martin Garcia and Sebastian Prieto of Argentina 6-1, 6-4, 6-7, 6-3.

Today Bjorkman stands one victory away from only his second Slam semi-final. His first, at the US Open in 1997, ended in defeat by Greg Rusedski. The secret of being in the quarters here aged 34, he says, is "no expectations".

"I try to enjoy the moment of being here because obviously I know well my age," he said. "I don't have too many more Wimbledons, and that's why I need to be even more in a situation that I'm going to have to enjoy it."

Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine