Net Gains: Ivanovic puts up a futile defence as tongues start wagging

When you are one of the world's most beautiful sportswomen, speculation about your private life is inevitable, especially when someone new appears in your entourage. Ana Ivanovic said she would "rather talk about my tennis at the moment", but it was no surprise when she was asked yesterday about the courtside presence of Adam Scott, the Australian golfer, who watched the Serbian beauty play for the second time this week. "I wouldn't like to comment on that," Ivanovic said, before adding: "I think it's great to see familiar faces in your box when you look for support." Ivanovic's brief relationship with the Spanish tennis player Fernando Verdasco ended at the start of this year, at around the same time Scott was said to be dating the actress Kate Hudson after breaking up with his long-time girlfriend Marie Kojzar. Ivanovic and Scott are both Rolex ambassadors and both live in Switzerland. Ivanovic is such a big name in Belgrade, she can barely walk down the street without being mobbed, which is one of the reasons why she likes living in Basel, which is also Roger Federer's home city. "There are quite a lot of famous people who live in Basel, like Michael Schumacher, so people keep their distance and give you privacy," she said.

SW19's camp followers

With 12,000 people in the queue for daily tickets, the All England Club started turning spectators away as early as 8am yesterday. The queue for tickets for tomorrow began forming two days ago. The golf course opposite the All England Club becomes London's biggest campsite during Wimbledon fortnight. Hundreds of queuers sleep there overnight, though it is not unknown for some to nod off during the day. Last week two women drove down from Edinburgh overnight, joined the queue and took what was planned as a brief nap in the grass. Five hours later they woke up to find that several thousand people had moved ahead of them in the queue. It was a good job the All England Club issues queuing cards, which enabled the two women to recover their place.

Poles no longer apart

It's amazing who you meet here. Two Polish sisters, who moved to Britain with their parents 15 years ago, are working as night stewards. They immediately recognised one of the other stewards – a best friend from Warsaw schooldays with whom they had completely lost contact after she had left Poland at about the same time.

It's galling for Galina

It takes a brave – or foolish – person to argue with the stewards, but the tall and feisty Kazakh player Galina Voskoboeva did just that. She wanted to watch her friend Elena Vesnina play but because she did not have the requisite pass she was refused entry to Court 18. A heated argument lasting several games ensued until Voskoboeva was forced to give up the uneven fight.

Murray on a mission

Not content with bringing into the world a future world No 3 singles player and a future Wimbledon mixed doubles champion, Judy Murray now wants to bring through more winners by setting up a junior tennis academy in central Scotland. She is looking for a development partner in the project. Anyone interested should contact Phillip Sandilands at the sports consultancy TrioPlus ( psandilands@trioplusonline.co.uk).

p.newman@independent.co.uk

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