Notes and quotes from the U.S. Open

BURNING DESIRE: Pete Sampras says he believed the turning point of his career came in 1992, when he lost to Stefan Edberg in the final at the Open.

BURNING DESIRE: Pete Sampras says he believed the turning point of his career came in 1992, when he lost to Stefan Edberg in the final at the Open.

"That match changed my career," Sampras said in an in-depth interview to be broadcast on CBS Sports on Saturday. "I can honestly say if I didn't lose that match, I wouldn't have what I have today. Until that point, I didn't hate to lose. I didn't have that burning desire. I remember the match against Edberg, I gave in a little bit ... It ate away at me and bothered me. It changed my career."

HEADS OR TAILS: Four youngsters from the New York Junior Tennis League were selected to conduct the coin toss for the women's and men's finals at the U.S. Open.

Teresa Bonano, 12, of the Bronx and Mychal Defreitas of Whitestone, New York, were tabbed to toss the coin before the women's final Saturday. Jose Loren of the Bronx and Jennifer Chu of New York City, will handle the duties before Sunday's men's final.

AU REVOIR: Rick Leach played the final Grand Slam doubles match of his career Friday, losing the Open championship title with Ellis Ferreira to youngsters Max Mirnyi and Lleyton Hewitt 6-4, 5-7. 6-7 (5).

Leach, who began his professional career in 1987, will become assistant men's tennis coach at the University of Southern California, where his father, Dick, is the head coach.

YOUNG GUNS: For the first time since 1977, three Americans reached the semifinals of the U.S. Open boys championship.

Andy Roddick, Ytai Abougzir and Robbie Ginepri each posted straight-set victories in Friday's quarterfinals, becoming the first American trio to advance that far since Van Winitsky, Eliot Teltscher and Tim Wilkinson.

Roddick, the 18-year-old No. 1 seed, will face Mario Ancic of Croatia. Ginepri, of Marietta, Georgia, will play Abougzir, of Boca Raton, Florida.

Comments