Serena Williams could face further action over outburst

Serena Williams will discover today whether her latest run-in with officialdom will lead to more than just a few negative headlines.

Two years after her infamous verbal attack on a lineswoman cost her a point penalty and her US Open semi-final against Kim Clijsters, the American was back in the limelight for all the wrong reasons at Flushing Meadows.



Williams was being outplayed by Samantha Stosur in only the Australian's second grand slam final and had already lost the first set.



She was battling to hang onto her serve at the start of the second and thought she had saved a second break point when she let out a huge cry of 'come on'.



But the ball had not yet reached Stosur and, under grand slam rules, a deliberate hindrance, such as an intentional shout during a point, sees the perpetrator lose the point.



A furious Williams harangued umpire Eva Asderaki and then continued to insult the official at the next change of ends, calling her "out of control", a "hater" and "unattractive inside".



The American, who eventually lost 6-2 6-3, was given a hefty fine for her 2009 offence and was still playing under a suspended ban, which could see her barred from the 2012 US Open for another major offence.



She was only given a code violation for today's outburst so it is unlikely a ban would be enforced, but the United States Tennis Association will decide today whether to fine her.



A statement from the organisers also added: "Any impact this code violation might have on Serena Williams' Grand Slam probation would require the incident being ruled a major event. That determination will be made by the Grand Slam Committee Director."



Williams, who did not shake Asderaki's hand after the match, refused to apologise and was unwilling to discuss the incident, saying only: "I don't even remember what I said.



"It was just so intense out there. It's the final for me. I guess I'll see it on YouTube. I don't know. I was just in the zone. I think everyone when they play kind of 'zones out'."



While the match will inevitably be remembered for Williams' conduct, what cannot be overstated is just how well Stosur played on her first match on Arthur Ashe Stadium to win her maiden grand slam title.



The 27-year-old, the first Australian woman to win a grand slam title since Evonne Goolagong in 1980, said: "I'm still kind of speechless. I can't actually believe I won this tournament.



"I've played matches where I feel like I can't miss a ball, and it's fantastic, but to do it under these circumstances in this kind of final against a player like Serena, for sure I'm going to think it's one of the best days of my career."



BUY WIMBLEDON TICKETS

Sport
England's women celebrate after their 3rd place play-off win against Germany
Women's World CupFara Williams converts penalty to secure victory and bronze medals
Arts and Entertainment
Ricardo by Edward Sutcliffe, 2014
artPortraits of LA cricketers from notorious suburb go on display
News
newsHillary Clinton comments on viral Humans of New York photo of gay teenager
Arts and Entertainment
The gang rape scene in the Royal Opera’s production of Gioachino Rossini’s Guillaume Tell has caused huge controversy
music
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

The Greek referendum exposes a gaping hole at the heart of the European Union – its distinct lack of any genuine popular legitimacy

Gaping hole at the heart of the European Union

Treatment of Greece has shown up a lack of genuine legitimacy
Number of young homeless in Britain 'more than three times the official figures'

'Everything changed when I went to the hostel'

Number of young homeless people in Britain is 'more than three times the official figures'
Compton Cricket Club

Compton Cricket Club

Portraits of LA cricketers from notorious suburb to be displayed in London
London now the global money-laundering centre for the drug trade, says crime expert

Wlecome to London, drug money-laundering centre for the world

'Mexico is its heart and London is its head'
The Buddhist temple minutes from Centre Court that helps a winner keep on winning

The Buddhist temple minutes from Centre Court

It helps a winner keep on winning
Is this the future of flying: battery-powered planes made of plastic, and without flight decks?

Is this the future of flying?

Battery-powered planes made of plastic, and without flight decks
Isis are barbarians – but the Caliphate is a dream at the heart of all Muslim traditions

Isis are barbarians

but the Caliphate is an ancient Muslim ideal
The Brink's-Mat curse strikes again: three tons of stolen gold that brought only grief

Curse of Brink's Mat strikes again

Death of John 'Goldfinger' Palmer the latest killing related to 1983 heist
Greece debt crisis: 'The ministers talk to us about miracles' – why Greeks are cynical ahead of the bailout referendum

'The ministers talk to us about miracles'

Why Greeks are cynical ahead of the bailout referendum
Call of the wild: How science is learning to decode the way animals communicate

Call of the wild

How science is learning to decode the way animals communicate
Greece debt crisis: What happened to democracy when it’s a case of 'Vote Yes or else'?

'The economic collapse has happened. What is at risk now is democracy...'

If it doesn’t work in Europe, how is it supposed to work in India or the Middle East, asks Robert Fisk
The science of swearing: What lies behind the use of four-letter words?

The science of swearing

What lies behind the use of four-letter words?
The Real Stories of Migrant Britain: Clive fled from Zimbabwe - now it won't have him back

The Real Stories of Migrant Britain

Clive fled from Zimbabwe - now it won’t have him back
Africa on the menu: Three foodie friends want to popularise dishes from the continent

Africa on the menu

Three foodie friends want to popularise dishes from the hot new continent
Donna Karan is stepping down after 30 years - so who will fill the DKNY creator's boots?

Who will fill Donna Karan's boots?

The designer is stepping down as Chief Designer of DKNY after 30 years. Alexander Fury looks back at the career of 'America's Chanel'