US Open 2013: Dan Evans roars back to shock Bernard Tomic and secure place in third round

British qualifier finds his feet after losing first set 6-1 and outplays highly rated Australian

Flushing Meadows

You would have got long odds a fortnight ago on Dan Evans being the first British man to reach the third round of the US Open but the 23-year-old from Birmingham moved into the last 32 here tonight with his second big victory of the week.

Evans, who had to win three matches in qualifying just to reach the main draw, followed his straight-sets victory over Kei Nishikori, the world No 12, by knocking out Bernard Tomic, the world No 52 and one of the game's outstanding young talents. The world No 179 recovered from a slow start to win 1-6, 6-3, 7-6, 6-3 and earn a meeting with the winner of tonight's later match between Spain's Tommy Robredo and Canada's Frank Dancevic.

Andy Murray, the defending champion, will hope to follow his fellow Briton into the third round today at the expense of Argentina's Leonardo Mayer. The Scot made his belated entry into the tournament on Wednesday night when he beat France's Michaël Llodra 6-2, 6-4, 6-3.

Although Evans began his first service game with an ace, he looked tight for most of the first set. Tomic's languid style can be difficult for opponents to work out and Evans appeared reluctant to play his normal attacking game. From 1-1 Tomic won five games in a row to take the first set in just 22 minutes.

When the Australian broke to take a 2-1 lead in the second set it seemed that Evans might be heading for an early exit, but instead it proved to be the signal for the Briton to come out of his shell. Capitalising on some slack play by Tomic, Evans broke back to level at 2-2 and suddenly began playing with the attacking verve that can be his trademark.

Rediscovering the confidence to attack the net and put away his volleys, Evans had Tomic on the back foot for the first time. After two more breaks Evans served out for the set, converting his fourth set point when Tomic put a return wide.

After an exchange of breaks in the opening two games the third set went to a tie-break, which Evans dominated. From 2-2 he went 5-2 up with a brilliant backhand volley followed by two forehand winners. Tomic saved one set point with a big cross-court forehand but on the second Evans hit a fine forehand winner down the line.

 

Get Adobe Flash player

 



The fourth set opened with two more breaks of serve before Evans made what proved to be the crucial break to lead 3-1. At 5-3 the Briton served out for victory in impressive fashion, finishing the job after two hours and 20 minutes with a service winner.

Murray's defence of his title finally began just before 10pm on Wednesday night. Already irked by not being scheduled to play his first match until the evening of the third day, the Scot then found himself featuring in the third-latest start to a night session in US Open history after lengthy rain delays earlier in the day.

"If it had rained tonight and we hadn't got finished, that would have been a problem for me," Murray said after his 98-minute victory. "I would have had to play three five-set matches in four days. That's very difficult. That's hard on the body, especially on this surface. I'm glad I got the match out of the way."

Mayer, Murray's next opponent, was born on exactly the same day as Murray, but thereafter the parallels between the two men are hard to find. A clay-court specialist who has never been in the world's top 50 or won a singles title on the main tour, the world No 81 has crossed paths with Murray only once, when he lost in three tight sets on a hard court in Valencia four years ago.

  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

The saffron censorship that governs India: Why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression

The saffron censorship that governs India

Zareer Masani reveals why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression
Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Supreme Court rules Dominic Grieve's ministerial veto was invalid
Distressed Zayn Malik fans are cutting themselves - how did fandom get so dark?

How did fandom get so dark?

Grief over Zayn Malik's exit from One Direction seemed amusing until stories of mass 'cutting' emerged. Experts tell Gillian Orr the distress is real, and the girls need support
The galaxy collisions that shed light on unseen parallel Universe

The cosmic collisions that have shed light on unseen parallel Universe

Dark matter study gives scientists insight into mystery of space
The Swedes are adding a gender-neutral pronoun to their dictionary

Swedes introduce gender-neutral pronoun

Why, asks Simon Usborne, must English still struggle awkwardly with the likes of 's/he' and 'they'?
Disney's mega money-making formula: 'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan

Disney's mega money-making formula

'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan
Lobster has gone mainstream with supermarket bargains for £10 or less - but is it any good?

Lobster has gone mainstream

Anthea Gerrie, raised on meaty specimens from the waters around Maine, reveals how to cook up an affordable feast
Easter 2015: 14 best decorations

14 best Easter decorations

Get into the Easter spirit with our pick of accessories, ornaments and tableware
Paul Scholes column: Gareth Bale would be a perfect fit at Manchester United and could turn them into serious title contenders next season

Paul Scholes column

Gareth Bale would be a perfect fit at Manchester United and could turn them into serious title contenders next season
Inside the Kansas greenhouses where Monsanto is 'playing God' with the future of the planet

The future of GM

The greenhouses where Monsanto 'plays God' with the future of the planet
Britain's mild winters could be numbered: why global warming is leaving UK chillier

Britain's mild winters could be numbered

Gulf Stream is slowing down faster than ever, scientists say
Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Donation brings total raised by Homeless Veterans campaign to at least £1.25m
Oh dear, the most borrowed book at Bank of England library doesn't inspire confidence

The most borrowed book at Bank of England library? Oh dear

The book's fifth edition is used for Edexcel exams
Cowslips vs honeysuckle: The hunt for the UK’s favourite wildflower

Cowslips vs honeysuckle

It's the hunt for UK’s favourite wildflower
Child abuse scandal: Did a botched blackmail attempt by South African intelligence help Cyril Smith escape justice?

Did a botched blackmail attempt help Cyril Smith escape justice?

A fresh twist reveals the Liberal MP was targeted by the notorious South African intelligence agency Boss