Wimbledon 2013: Kyle Edmund warns Andy Murray he faces a battle to beat Jerzy Janowicz

The British youngster played Murray's semi-final opponent in the first round

Kyle Edmund believes Jerzy Janowicz has a good chance of beating Andy Murray in the Wimbledon semi-finals tomorrow.

British teenager Edmund was Janowicz's first victim on his run at the All England Club, the 18-year-old managing eight games against his giant opponent.

At 6ft 8in, Janowicz is certainly not a player who can be taken lightly, and Edmund believes Murray's returns off the Pole's 140mph serves will be key.

"Andy has got to return well, which he does anyway," said Edmund, who is through to the semi-finals of the boys' singles.

"When I played him the main objective was to keep the ball in play, and when it did go in play his forehand and backhand were very good and he was just swinging.

"He has such a good game. Andy knows his abilities and what he can do with the ball but Janowicz is playing well.

"He is a danger. He was a danger at the start of the tournament. It was a tough draw and he has shown why by reaching the semis.

"You have to be playing well. He obviously has a good chance (against Murray)."

Janowicz is the biggest beneficiary of the early exits of Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal.

The quarter-final in that section of the draw was supposed to be between the two superstars of the men's game, but instead history was made as two Polish players met at that stage for the first time in a grand slam.

Janowicz defeated compatriot Lukasz Kubot to become the first male Polish semi-finalist at a slam, an achievement that reduced the big man to tears.

He said: "I'm really proud to represent my country. Always I'm happy to play a Davis Cup tie. I haven't missed even one match from 2008. So this is really important for me."

Janowicz and Murray have met twice before, with the Scot winning a Davis Cup rubber in 2009 but beaten in Paris last November.

The Masters event at Paris Bercy was Janowicz's real breakthrough.

As a qualifier, he made it all the way to the final, beating Marin Cilic, Janko Tipsarevic and Gilles Simon as well as Murray before losing to David Ferrer.

But reaching a Wimbledon semi-final has surpassed that for the 22-year-old, who said as he reflected on his win over Kubot: "Right now I'm the most happy person in the world.

"I made the semi-final of a grand slam, my best result ever. Also I have in my mind last year Paris Bercy. I was there in the final.

"But this is a little bit different situation. This is a grand slam. You have different emotions in your heart, so I think this Wimbledon goes in front of Bercy."

Janowicz will undoubtedly take confidence from his win over Murray in Paris, but he knows it was very close to being a different result.

Murray held a match point in the second set but ended up losing in three - one of three successive defeats post-US Open triumph in which the Scot held match points.

Janowicz said: "That match was really close. He had a match point. It was a really long rally. He missed the shot by a few centimetres. So I could have lost that match easily. The key maybe was I was fighting all the time."

PA

Life and Style
food + drink
Life and Style
love + sex A new study has revealed the average size - but does that leave men outside the 'normal' range being thought of as 'abnormal'?
News
UK Border Control
i100
Arts and Entertainment
TV
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Syrian conflict is the world's first 'climate change war', say scientists, but it won't be the last one

Climate change key in Syrian conflict

And it will trigger more war in future
How I outwitted the Gestapo

How I outwitted the Gestapo

My life as a Jew in wartime Berlin
The nation's favourite animal revealed

The nation's favourite animal revealed

Women like cuddly creatures whilst men like creepy-crawlies
Is this the way to get young people to vote?

Getting young people to vote

From #VOTESELFISH to Bite the Ballot
Poldark star Heida Reed: 'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'

Poldark star Heida Reed

'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'
The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn