The 10 Best running shoes

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Whether you are running for the bus or preparing to run April’s London Marathon, these shoes are sure to help you on your way

{1} The North Face Hyper-Track Guide

The latest trail-running shoe from  the North Face, in stores in early March, is designed to withstand all but the  rockiest of roads, and is lightweight enough to perform well on asphalt. Good for triathlons or short cuts in  the park.

£100, thenorthface.com/eu

{2} K-Swiss Blade-Max Glide

Not aesthetically to every runner’s  taste, but the Blade-Max shoes  take support for those who want  it to new, “superfoam” levels with  lightweight cushioning suited to  runners with joints to preserve over long distances.

£95, kswiss.co.uk

{3} TevaSphere Speed

Sandal supremo Teva dips a toe into trainer territory with a lightweight range, out in March, that strips back  bulk but not support. A rounded heel  is supposed to reduce the wrong kind  of leverage, while pods at the arch increase stability.

£90, cotswoldoutdoor.com

{4} Brooks PureDrift

A favourite at London custom  sports-shoe fitters Profeet, the  PureDrift combines barely-there  uppers and almost-as-light soles  to bring minimal support to those  who favour barefoot running.  Seek advice before embracing the  barefoot boom.

£110, profeet.co.uk

{5} Saucony Peregrine 2

Blaze trails, however uneven, in the  latest off-road pair from Saucony. A tough grip that goes in all directions gives good traction on all surfaces yet thin but sturdy soles keep things responsive, and a minimal upper keeps things lightweight.

£85, profeet.co.uk

{6} VivoBarefoot Evo II

Barefoot pioneers and hexagon fans Vivo offers added insulation and  water-resistant uppers in its second striking Evo shoe, making it suitable  for varied surfaces when used all  year-round. Minimalism was never  so warm.

£89, vivobarefoot.com

{7} Brooks Defyance 6

A proper running shoe free of bells, whistles or garish designs but which wins respect among runners for its  balance of support, cushioning  and rigidity. Similar in construction  to the renowned Adrenaline but  lighter still.

£89.99, milletsports.co.uk

{8} Nike Flyknit Lunar1+

Nike’s newest premium runners bring its Olympic tech to your pavement. Uppers are a single piece of material knitted by computer paired with light but cushioned soles. Nike will even steam-fit them to your foot at its flagship London store.

£140, store.nike.com

{9} Asics Gel Nimbus 14W

Asics’ flagship cushioned trainer  has lost a few grams but none of  its comfort, making it ideal for  longer runs. The cushioned sole is  softer in the middle in the women’s model, to account for a lighter  average-runner weight.

£130, asics.co.uk

{10} Vibram FiveFingers Seeya

Their looks divide runners as well as they do toes but FiveFingers fans  swear by their unusual shoes. The  Seeya strips materials to a new  minimum, bringing your feet in  closer contact to the road. Be sure to learn how to use them first.

£115, barefootjunkie.com

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