If you're interested in preserving the environment, English Heritage will train you

I could go on all day about my job," says Clara Turlington, "it's hard not to be enthusiastic about it." It's not often that you hear people speak with such passion about their work, but not everyone gets to hold their morning meetings in stately homes or hike up the highest peaks and be paid for it. York-born Turlington is a trainee on English Heritage's Historic Environment Managers scheme, an experience she describes as "exceptional and unparalleled".

What makes it so good? English Heritage launched the two-year scheme in 2008 after a modest increase in government funding. "English Heritage had long had aspirations to establish a scheme to train professionals entering conservation," says Steven Bee, the director of planning and development at English Heritage.

"The programme equips trainees with the necessary knowledge of the various elements of heritage conservation and offers them the opportunity to gain practical experience. Perhaps, most important, it enables them to appreciate that conservation is a means of managing change rather than blocking it, and of capturing the investment necessary to sustain the long-term future of historic places by ensuring that they help to meet the needs of people today and tomorrow."

English Heritage is the Government's statutory adviser on the historic environment and works with a wide range of government departments. The two-year historic environment management scheme is divided into units, some of which are core subjects, such as heritage protection. Students then choose four out of a further six subject areas, including architecture, historic buildings, archaeology, landscape and planning. "This approach," says Turlington, "has enabled me to tailor the scheme towards my own particular interests and career aspirations."

Before Turlington joined the scheme, she studied politics and international relations at Lancaster University, followed by an MSc in town planning at Newcastle University. While working happily for the North Yorkshire Moors National Park Authority, she was idly browsing the English Heritage website when she spied an ad for the scheme. "It appealed to me immediately and fitted in perfectly with the stage I was at in my professional career," she says.

Turlington was one of the first to join the scheme so no one knew what to expect, least of all her, but her instinct told her it was an opportunity not to be missed. In her role, Turlington – who's about to start a two-month secondment with York City Council – works closely with English Heritage in the Yorkshire and Humber region, work-shadowing, assisting with research for cases and drafting advice, as well as getting to grips with the practical, ethical and legal challenges facing the heritage sector. "I realise now that I never fully appreciated the diversity of work that English Heritage covers as the Government's statutory adviser on the historic environment," she says.

Within her first year, Turlington had been on a range of site visits – from hiking up the second-highest peak in the Yorkshire Dales to considering management issues of a scheduled monument to discussing the design of new development in historic areas within the highly-graded buildings.

As a trainee, Turlington has to manage her own English Heritage project and she has decided to focus on the effectiveness of green belts in England at preserving the setting of historic cities. "This is a project English Heritage has wanted to complete for some time," she says, "and it allows me to use my specialist knowledge of the planning system and conservation."

Traineeships: How to apply

* There are up to 10 traineeships each year, lasting two years

* The 14 trainees working with English Heritage are based across the country in the following offices: Birmingham, Bristol, Cambridge, Guildford, London, Manchester, Newcastle and York. All the traineeships are validated by English Heritage

* To undertake a traineeship, you should have a degree in a relevant subject such as archaeology, architecture or conservation. However, non-graduates with relevant work experience are encouraged

* Salaries range from £18,000 to £23,000 a year, depending on a trainee's experience and location

* To apply for next year's scheme visit www.english-heritage.org.uk/jobs

  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs Student

Ashdown Group: Learning and Development Programme Manager

£35000 - £38000 per annum + benefits : Ashdown Group: A highly successful, int...

Recruitment Genius: Marketing Assistant - IT Channel - Graduate

£16000 - £23000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This company is a Value-Added I...

Ashdown Group: Learning and Development Programme Manager

£35000 - £38000 per annum + benefits : Ashdown Group: A highly successful, int...

Guru Careers: Junior Web Developer

£18 - 22k (DOE) + Benefits & Stock Options: Guru Careers: A Junior Developer /...

Day In a Page

The saffron censorship that governs India: Why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression

The saffron censorship that governs India

Zareer Masani reveals why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression
Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Supreme Court rules Dominic Grieve's ministerial veto was invalid
Distressed Zayn Malik fans are cutting themselves - how did fandom get so dark?

How did fandom get so dark?

Grief over Zayn Malik's exit from One Direction seemed amusing until stories of mass 'cutting' emerged. Experts tell Gillian Orr the distress is real, and the girls need support
The galaxy collisions that shed light on unseen parallel Universe

The cosmic collisions that have shed light on unseen parallel Universe

Dark matter study gives scientists insight into mystery of space
The Swedes are adding a gender-neutral pronoun to their dictionary

Swedes introduce gender-neutral pronoun

Why, asks Simon Usborne, must English still struggle awkwardly with the likes of 's/he' and 'they'?
Disney's mega money-making formula: 'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan

Disney's mega money-making formula

'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan
Lobster has gone mainstream with supermarket bargains for £10 or less - but is it any good?

Lobster has gone mainstream

Anthea Gerrie, raised on meaty specimens from the waters around Maine, reveals how to cook up an affordable feast
Easter 2015: 14 best decorations

14 best Easter decorations

Get into the Easter spirit with our pick of accessories, ornaments and tableware
Paul Scholes column: Gareth Bale would be a perfect fit at Manchester United and could turn them into serious title contenders next season

Paul Scholes column

Gareth Bale would be a perfect fit at Manchester United and could turn them into serious title contenders next season
Inside the Kansas greenhouses where Monsanto is 'playing God' with the future of the planet

The future of GM

The greenhouses where Monsanto 'plays God' with the future of the planet
Britain's mild winters could be numbered: why global warming is leaving UK chillier

Britain's mild winters could be numbered

Gulf Stream is slowing down faster than ever, scientists say
Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Donation brings total raised by Homeless Veterans campaign to at least £1.25m
Oh dear, the most borrowed book at Bank of England library doesn't inspire confidence

The most borrowed book at Bank of England library? Oh dear

The book's fifth edition is used for Edexcel exams
Cowslips vs honeysuckle: The hunt for the UK’s favourite wildflower

Cowslips vs honeysuckle

It's the hunt for UK’s favourite wildflower
Child abuse scandal: Did a botched blackmail attempt by South African intelligence help Cyril Smith escape justice?

Did a botched blackmail attempt help Cyril Smith escape justice?

A fresh twist reveals the Liberal MP was targeted by the notorious South African intelligence agency Boss