Bangor University

 

 

Overall ranking: 64th out of 123 in the Complete University Guide for 2015.

History: Began as University College of North Wales, Bangor. Previously University of Wales, Bangor. Now Bangor University since 2007.

Address: North Wales coast. Do not confuse with 18 other Bangors worldwide. This one is situated between Snowdonia and the sea - an attractive location by anybody's standards.

Ambience: Wonderful position. The town is actually a city with the longest high street in Wales. Surrounding it all is the countryside, castles and a strong Welsh-speaking area. Boasts the best university setting in the UK with parts within six feet of the sea. Wet blowy weather but virtually no snow, although you will spot it on Snowdonia’s highest peaks. Great for those keen on sport and the great outdoors.

Who's the boss? Professor John Hughes, mathematician and theoretical physicist, became the university's seventh vice chancellor in 2010.

Prospectus: 01248 383 561 or request one online here.

UCAS code: B06

What you need to know

Easy to get into? Courses ask for 240 to 360 UCAS entry points.

Vital statistics: Previously part of the University of Wales, which underwent big-time restructuring in the 80s. Only a third of students come from Wales, and worldwide Bangor has more than 12,000 students. A large majority of that number are in Bangor, so there are lots students for such a small place, giving it a strong community feel.

Added value: The ocean sciences department has a multi-million pound research ship. Undergraduates can get involved in the Bangor Employability Award (BEA) - a scheme which offers accreditation for co-curricular and extra curricular activities (e.g. volunteering, part-time work, clubs and societies etc.) that may not be formally recognised within the academic degree programme yet are valuable in the graduate jobs market. A new £40m Arts and Innovation Centre will open later in 2014. The centre will be home to cutting-edge teaching and learning facilities, a theatre, cinema space, a studio theatre, exhibition spaces, social learning area and a bar and café. New degrees on offer include British and Irish literatures BA (Hons); geological oceanography MOcean; law with contemporary Chinese studies LLB; physical oceanography MOcean; psychology with business BSc (Hons); and music and sonic arts BA (Hons). One of the largest peer guiding schemes of any university. The International Experience Programme offers students the chance to study for a year in another country and have 'with international experience' added to their degree title.

Teaching: 47th out of 123 for student satisfaction with teaching quality in the Complete University Guide.

Graduate prospects: 68th out of 123 with 61.9 per cent of students finding graduate level employment.

Any accommodation? Yes. There are over around 2,300 in Bangor, and accommodation is guaranteed to all first years. Prices start at around £83 per week, going up to £127. New halls of residence are also set to open in 2015, offering 600 rooms and will include a cafe, bar, shop, laundrette, common rooms and on-side sports facilities.

Cheap to live there? One of the cheapest places to live in Britain with private accommodation at around £55 to £75 per week.

Transport links: Good. 90 minutes from Manchester via the A55, while direct trains from London Euston take three hours and 20 minutes.

Fees: For 2014/15 entry the fees were set at £9,000 a year for full-time UK applicants. Students from Wales or the EU outside the UK, including the Republic of Ireland, may be eligible for a non-repayable tuition fee grant from the Welsh Government.

Bursaries: Over £3.7m in scholarships on offer for 2014 entry, for further details visit the website.

The fun stuff

Nightlife: There are four nightclubs. The Students’ Union nightclub, Academi, also houses two bars, a café and shop. Peep is another favourite, and there are plenty of pubs in town for bar crawls.

Price of a pint: £3.30 for a pint of lager in Bangor.

Sporting reputation: So, so- 68th out of 145 in the BUCS league at present.

Notable societies: Spin some tales with the Storytelling Society, or get involved in film-making with Student Cut Films.

Glittering alumni: Oscar-winner Danny Boyle, director of Slumdog Millionaire, Trainspotting and The Beach; Dr Robert Edwards, pioneer of test-tube babies; Ann Clwyd, Labour MP, Lord Dafydd Elis-Thomas, Presiding Officer, National Assembly for Wales; John Sessions, impressionist; Frances Barber, actress, Tim Haines, director (Walking with Dinosaurs).

Alternative prospectus: Check out Study at Bangor for some tips on places to go, which accommodation to choose, and other snippers of advice.

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