Brighton, University of

 

 

Overall ranking: Came 73rd out of 123 in the Complete University Guide for 2015.

History: First incarnation was the above. Then it became a technical college. Then it was reincarnated as colleges of art, education and technology. Then it was a poly; and, finally, the University of Brighton.

Address: Based on three campuses in Brighton (Grand Parade, Falmer, Moulsecoomb), one in Eastbourne and one in Hastings. It's worth checking where your course will be based, as the atmosphere can vary. Also runs courses in several other areas in the region, including the new Plumpton College.

Ambience: Cool, creative, cosmopolitan and chilled-out. The student-friendly seaside town has a world-famous social life with clubs, pubs, restaurants, cinemas, bathing and, of course, there's the beach. Eastbourne is lively and friendly. Campuses in Brighton and Eastbourne are separated by spectacular coastal scenery and the South Downs.

Who's the boss? The vice chancellor is Professor Julian Crampton, a molecular biologist specialising in tropical medicine, particularly the treatment of malaria and venomous snake and spider bites. He joined Brighton from the University of Liverpool in 2005.

Prospectus: 01273 644 644 or request one here.

UCAS code: B72

What you need to know

Easy to get into? Varies: Operates a flexible admissions policy where applications are considered on merit. See here for more details.

Vital statistics: Strong tradition of vocational and professional courses: quirkier offerings include sport journalism, and viticulture and oenology. As the British university closest to the continent, it has many courses with a strong European focus. Huge student body with 21,312 students- made up of full-time undergrads, part-time, postgrad and research students.

Added value: Excellent sports facilities- a new £7.6m sports centre opened in 2010. There's a new culinary arts studio, while £100m has been pumped into building projects, facilitating a radio station, flight simulator and real-time trading room. The new £23m Huxley building at the Moulsecoomb site opened for use in 2010 and houses the majority of the university's work in pharmacy and biosciences. £100m is currently being invested, half of which into student accommodation and learning facilities. Centre of Excellence for design and creativity. The university has secured £17.4m of government funding for three major developments in the city: a new Central Research Laboratory at Preston Barracks; the regeneration of Circus Street to provide new academic building and student accommodation and an engineering Centre of Excellence in Moulsecoomb that will be developed in partnership with Shoreham-based engineering firm Ricardo.

Teaching: 57th out of 123 for student satisfaction with teaching in the Complete University Guide- a huge improvement.

Graduate prospects: 84th out of 123 with 58.4 per cent finding graduate level employment upon completing their degrees.

Any accommodation? Yes. A wide range of options are available, catered and self-catered. Self-catered costs £124.44 per week on average, while catered rooms- only provided in the Brighton and Eastbourne halls- are £157 on average.

Cheap to live there? Not too bad for the south east. For Brighton, the average cost of a room in a shared house is about £100 per week. For Eastbourne, the average is around £80 to £85 and Hastings about £87-£95 per week. 

Transport links: Good train, boat and road links. London is less than an hour by train, while Eastbourne is an hour and a half away. Gatwick Airport and Newhaven cross-channel ferry port are nearby. Great bus service, or bring your bike.

Fees: The university charges the full £9,000 per year for full-time home and EU undergrads.

Bursaries: Bursaries and scholarships of between £540 and £1,080 per year are available to eligible students, including a sports scholarship for elite, talented or disabled athletes. Check the website for details.

The fun stuff

Nightlife: The party capital of the south coast, known as London-by-the-Sea. Legendary clubbing scene in town. On campus there are some small students' union bars and a couple of balls a year.

Price of a pint: Steep- the price of a pint is £3.40 on average in Brighton.

Sporting reputation: 37th out of 145 in the current BUCS league, so they're quite a sporty bunch by the sea.

Notable societies: A host of tempting groups- from the Brighton Panthers Dance Squad to cheerleading, hula-hooping, major noob gaming and radio production.

Glittering alumni: Helen Chadwick, artist; Jo Whiley, Radio 1 presenter; Norman Cook, known as Fatboy Slim; Keith Tyson and Rachel Whitehead, Turner Prize winners; Julien Macdonald, fashion designer.

Alternative prospectus: Join in discussions with former, current and prospective students on The Student Room to glean more information about life at Brighton.

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