Bristol, University of

 

 

Overall ranking: Came 15th out of 126 in the Complete University Guide for 2016.

History: Founded in 1876 as University College Bristol. Received a royal charter from Edward VII in 1909.

Address: Based in the heart of buzzing Bristol, close to the beautiful Georgian Clifton Village, the bustling harbourside and the boutiques and museums of Park Street.

Ambience: Beautiful, historic city with a vibrant social and cultural scene and countryside across Brunel's famous suspension bridge. Clifton and Redland are still student areas, but steep rents push students further afield. The university sprawls across Georgian squares and grey blocks. The city is large enough to provide a range of clubs, bars and restaurants, yet small enough to feel a sense of community.

Who's the boss? Professor Sir Eric Thomas is the current Vice Chancellor however in September 2015 Professor Hugh Brady, the former President and Chief officer of University College Dublin, will take up the position.

Prospectus: 0117 928 9000 or request one here.

UCAS code: B78

What you need to know

Easy to get into? Very competitive. Applications per place for an undergrad degree range from 6.7 for arts, to over 18 applications for medicine and dentistry. The University do not use the UCAS system however the average points acceptance by tariff is around 460.

Vital statistics: Over 16,000 undergraduates and just under 3,500 postgraduates. A substantial number of students come from private schools but the university has been making strict attempts to widen access. Bristol is one of 24 Russell Group universities, dedicated to the highest levels of academic research.

Added value: Strong academic reputation across the board particularly in the Arts, Medicine and Engineering Design  . One of the largest Students' Union buildings in the country. Well-established student drama scene. The recently refurbished Richmond Building plays host to a variety of music events and performances at the Anson Rooms, in addition to the Balloon Bar and Cafe. Other services based within the building include the CELFS (Centre for English Language and Foundation Studies) and the University of Bristol Swimming Pool.

Teaching: Came 94th out of 126 for student satisfaction in the Complete University Guide.

Graduate prospects: Ranked 11th out of 126, with 80.2 per cent of students finding graduate level employment.

Any accommodation? Plenty. University residences start at £120.52 per week for catered rooms, and £78.18 for self-catered rooms.

Cheap to live there? Not really. There's great variation in private rents, with the average being around £134 per week. Cheaper areas are available further from the University.

Transport links: Excellent road and rail links. Handy for the M4, M5 and second Severn crossing, and 20 minutes from the international airport.

Fees: £9,000 for full-time home undergrads. Overseas fees vary depending on course.

Bursaries: There are a number of tuition fee waivers available for eligible students from households with an income lower than £25,000, plus bursaries and scholarships based on specific criteria. See here for more details.

The fun stuff

Nightlife: Bristol has a varied music scene. Fans of dance music need look no further than motion, ranked 29th best club in the world , whilst those in search of a more alternative experience can explore stokes croft for a multitude of bars and clubs such as Lakota, crofters rights and attic bar. The O2 academy regularly plays host to big names, there is a thriving open mic scene and those more into rock music can head down to Thekla - a nightclub housed in a former cargo ship with a banksy mural on its hull. For more student orientated nights out the triangle in Clifton is packed with different offerings from the famous bunker to the infamous lizard lounge. There are also plenty of annual events, such as St. Paul's carnival, the balloon fiesta and the the harbourside festival

Price of a pint: You're looking at around £3.

Sporting reputation: Good- currently at 16th place in the BUCS league.

Notable societies: Bristol boasts 300 societies and clubs. Unicorn appreciation (BEDS) is particularly popular, There is also a Hot Air Ballooning society and a tea club. The University takes sport very seriously and there are a number of teams to join at Bristol.

Glittering alumni: Simon Pegg, actor; David Nicholls, author; David Walliams, comedian; James Blunt, singer; Derren Brown, illusionist; Sue Lawley, broadcaster; Paul Boateng, former chief secretary to the Treasury; and William Lewis, former Telegraph editor.

Alternative prospectus: Check out Bristol's board in The Student Room here.

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