Exeter, University of

 

 

Overall ranking: Ranked 10th out of 124 in the Complete University Guide for 2014.

History: Traces roots back to the school of art in 1855. In 1863 it spawned a school of science; in 1893 it became the Exeter Technical College; in 1922 it acquired the title University College of the South West of England; and in 1955 it became a university in its own right.

Address: Three campuses. Streatham caters for arts, science, social studies, law and engineering. Across the city is St Luke's, home to the graduate school of education, sport and health sciences, and the Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry. Carry on down the A30 to Cornwall to find the Cornwall Campus, Penryn, near Falmouth, which is shared with University College Falmouth, and opened in 2004.

Ambience: Mostly redbrick buildings set in a 250-acre garden estate one mile from the city centre. Beautiful beaches and Dartmoor close at hand. The university objects to the "green welly" tag that is often thrown at it and there has been a recent push to encourage more applications from students with less well-off backgrounds. Superior sports facilities and a gentle climate.

Who's the boss? Vice-chancellor and chief executive Professor Sir Steve Smith, a leading academic in the field of international politics.

Prospectus: 0844 620 0012 or download it here.

UCAS code: E84

What you need to know

Easy to get into? No. Courses ask for anything from 280 to 400 UCAS entry points. Prospective students are expected to have extended their studies beyond the typical choice of three A-levels. To study English a typical offer is A*AA while the Biological Sciences department asks for AAB.

Vital statistics: Competition for places is high, partly because of its sublime setting. There are 18,500 students, over 90 per cent of which are full-time. About three-quarters of undergraduates come from state schools and the proportion from lower socio-economic groups has been increasing steadily as a result of the university’s efforts to widen participation. A quarter of undergraduates come from the South West. Exeter is one of 24 Russell Group universities, dedicated to the highest levels of academic excellence.

Added value: A £270 million investment programme on Streatham Campus has recently been completed, including 2,600 new student accommodation places, a refurbishment of the School of Biosciences and a flagship forum. Degrees in clinical science, archaeology and forensic science, and civil and environmental engineering launched just two years ago. Exeter has a fantastic student media network: the weekly newspaper, TV station and student radio have all won student media awards.

Teaching: Place 7th out of 124 in the Complete University Guide this year.

Research: Ranked 27th out of 124 in the Research Assessment Exercise.

Graduate prospects: Placed 23rd with 74.6 per cent entering graduate level employment.

Any accommodation? Yes. Self-catering is between £97 to £152 per week while a single room in catered accommodation costs anything between £135 and £212 per week.

Cheap to live there? Fairly. Private rents are between £70 and £80 per week.

Transport links: M5 on the doorstep and London just over two hours away by train.

Fees: The maximum fee of £9000 will be charged to all new home and EU undergraduate students for 2013/14 entry. For overseas students, fees range between courses from £14,500 to £29,000.

Bursaries: There is a range of bursaries and fee waivers available- see the website. There are also sport and music scholarships available.

The fun stuff

Nightlife: Popular student bars on campus include The Ram and nightclub The Lemmy, which has recently undergone a £1m refit. Over the last couple of years the 2,000 capacity Great Hall has seen concerts by Arctic Monkeys, Feeder, Funeral for a Friend, Bloc Party, The Fratellis, Seth Lakeman, The Enemy, James Morrison, The Kooks, Razorlight, Newton Faulkner, Keane and The Zutons.

Price of a pint: Your average pint is around £3.

Sporting reputation: Great- currently ranked 6th in the BUCS league.

Calendar highlight: It used to be the notorious Safe Sex Ball but following controversial antics at the last event it has been cancelled, at least in its current format. The Graduation Ball is always fantastic- this year's theme is the Roaring Twenties.

Notable societies: Exeter has a Disney society- say no more. Other fun offerings include the cocktail and Dr Who societies.

Glittering alumni: JK Rowling, author of Harry Potter; Radiohead's Thom Yorke; Felix Buxton from Basement Jaxx; Will Young, winner of Pop Idol; First Sea Lord Admiral Sir Jonathan Band; Peter Phillips, son of the Princess Royal.

Alternative prospectus: Visit The Student Room here to chat with current and prospective students and work out whether Exeter may be the university for you.

 

 

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