Falmouth University

 

 

Overall ranking: 55th out of 123 in the Complete University Guide for 2015.

History: Created in 1902 as a private art school. Artists such as Barbara Hepworth supported its becoming a recognised art college but it changed its name to University College Falmouth in 2005, having been granted the right to award its own degree in 2004. In April 2008, Dartington College of Arts merged with University College Falmouth and in December 2012, it became Falmouth University.

Address: There are two campuses. The first is set in the lush sub-tropical gardens of Falmouth, a seaside resort on the unspoilt south coast of Cornwall. The second, opened in 1999, is a 70-acre country estate three miles away at Penryn, and is now the multi-million-pound hub campus of the combined universities in Cornwall, shared with the university of Exeter.

Ambience: A creative community, with surfing nearby. Wonderful sea views at Falmouth from the old Fox family house on the hill, the oldest part of the college. Modern buildings put up in the last 30 years in the Fox gardens, which stretch down to the sea and include art and design studios, and an interactive arts centre. The ancient township of Penryn oozes history but the modern campus at Tremough provides a friendly learning environment, with a multitude of exciting design and media courses.

Who's the boss? The Rector Professor Anne Carlisle, a practising artist, writer and broadcaster, and an award-winning academic, whose background is firmly established in the visual arts and creative industries.

Prospectus: 01326 213 730 or request one here.

UCAS code: F33

What you need to know

Easy to get into? Most courses require 260-300 UCAS entry points, but they also accept equivalent Level 3 qualifications or relevant experience.

Vital statistics: A college of art, design, media, and performance, it has 4,709 students in total. Approximately 3,583 undergraduates.

Added value: Vocational courses with plenty of practical work. Work experience placements are common, as are lectures from visiting professors and other professionals. Part of the United Kingdom Arts and Design Institutions Association. New performance centre and additional facilities, with £100m investment since 2004. The university also launched a new graduate entrepreneurship programme in May, Alacrity Falmouth, aiming to sow the seeds for the next generation of digital games companies, allowing graduates to create a new start-up and leaving directors and shareholders in a viable, sustainable business with a Masters in Business Entrepreneurship. September 2014 will see the first cohort join BA (Hons) Digital Games and BA (Hons) Business Entrepreneurship, which have been specifically tailored in response to industry demands.

Teaching: 102nd out of 123 for student satisfaction with teaching.

Graduate prospects: 75th out of 123 with 60.1 per cent finding graduate level employment.

Any accommodation? Yes, and its rated joint top for accommodation in the UK, according to the latest Times Higher Education Student Experience Survey. University owned and managed accommodation ranges from approximately £74 per week for a shared occupancy room, to £109 - £129 per week for single occupancy. The majority offer en suite facilities, including bills and furnishings. We also offer some self-contained studios and disabled adapted rooms. Falmouth guarantees every first year full-time foundation or undergraduate student accommodation in University owned or managed residences if they apply by the published deadline.

Cheap to live there? Not too bad- for local rented accommodation you could expect to pay anything from £80 per week. Make the most of The Accommodation Office, which offers students ongoing support to help them find a home.

Transport links: Take the train to Truro and change there for Falmouth Town or Penryn, or go by coach. Free bikes and discounted buses between campuses.

Fees: £9,000 a year for full-time UK and EU undergrads. International students pay more but the cost varies depending on the course.

Bursaries: The National Scholarship Programme awards £6,000 aimed to support UK students from areas that are under-represented in higher education. Students must come from households with an income of under £25,000. See here.

The fun stuff

Nightlife: The Stannary bar on the Penryn campus lays on events including live music and club nights. Numerous pubs, bars and a couple of clubs offering quirky and alternative options. A rich scene in a beautiful location.

Price of a pint: About £3.50 in Falmouth on average.

Sporting reputation: Not very sporty if the BUCS league is anything to go by- ranked 116th. Watersports is huge here though- there's a big stand-up paddle boarding scene.

Notable societies: There's not a huge range on offer, but plenty of arty ones, as expected. Fans of bees and honey will enjoy BeeSoc which gives students the chance to care for campus hives. Or take a spot of brew with the Tremough High Tea Society.

Glittering alumni: Tacita Dean, artist shortlisted for 1999 Turner Prize; Fergus Walsh and Matthew Amroliwala, correspondents for the BBC; Jethro Macey, designer and winner of the 2009 Hidden Art annual award; Tim Shaw, winner of the £10,000 Federation of British Artists Selectors' Choice award as part of the Threadneedle Figurative Prize; Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, Turner Prize nominee; Angus Walker, ITV China correspondent.

Alternative prospectus: Meet current, former and prospective students in The Student Room to talk about all things Falmouth University.

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