Gloucestershire, University of

 

 

Overall ranking: Came 91st out of 123 in the Complete University Guide for 2015.

History: Started life as the Mechanics Institutes in Cheltenham and Gloucester. A teacher training college with a Church Foundation Trust (which influences the university to this day) was set up in 1847. Formerly known as Cheltenham and Gloucester College of Higher Education, it became a university proper in 2001.

Address: Three campuses- two in Cheltenham and one in Gloucester. A London campus provides teacher training.

Ambience: Pleasant middle England. The main Park campus is as green and leafy as its name suggests, set in a conservation area with 30 acres of parkland. Francis Close Hall, which offers teacher training and more, has a mock-gothic quadrangle and clock tower. Fine art, design and media are based at Pittville and ten miles away sporty courses are housed at the modern Oxstalls campus, five minutes from the centre of Gloucester.

Who's the boss? Stephen Marston is the vice-chancellor.

Prospectus: Request a prospectus here.

UCAS code: G50

What you need to know

Easy to get into? The entry requirements for most undergraduate degrees are between 260 and 320, depending on the course. The university welcomes applications from mature students and works in partnership with local colleges. Some courses will require previous experience in the sector.

Vital statistics: Gloucestershire boasts 9,000 undergraduate students, 1,000 postgraduate students, and 40,000 alumni from a wide range of countries worldwide.

Added value: Keen on greenness, with recycling facilities on every campus. The University has Centre of Excellence status for its environmental programmes. Brand new media school and creative hub for art and design. Refurbished refectory and Students’ Union bar. They are also contributing to a £7 million investment to develop a Growth Hub, to support businesses in the area through promoting skills, innovation and enterprise. Other investments include £4 million into teaching and learning facilities – including a brand new film studio. New courses for 2015 include Fashion Design and Sports Journalism and in additional to three year degrees the university offers a wide range of fast-track courses which can be completed within two years.

Teaching: 93rd out of 123 for student satisfaction with teaching quality in the Complete University Guide.

Graduate prospects: 76th out of 123 with 60.1 per cent finding graduate level employment.

Any accommodation? Yes, a room in halls costs between £95 and £145 per week in a total of 1,381 rooms. The rent includes all utility bills, internet costs, contents insurance and cleaning of kitchens once a week. Contracts are for a fixed term of 40 weeks.

Cheap to live there? Gloucestershire have a list of University Approved Housing, advertising properties that meet strict criteria. The average rent for self-catered housing is £65 to £85 a room, per week (non-inclusive of bills 2013-2014 prices). Their Accommodation Department also keeps a list of study bedrooms available in houses where the owner lives in the same property. Average rents for self-catering are around £75 a week and half-board around £95 a week (inclusive of bills).

Transport links: Free bus service between the four campuses. Good rail and road links to the likes of London, Bristol, Cardiff, Birmingham and Oxford.

Fees: Fees will be £9,000 for full-time undergraduates in 2015-16, with £1,000 for a placement year in 2015-16 and £6000 to £7,500 for foundation degrees.

Bursaries: The university awards a bursary of £1,000 to eligible full-time undergraduate students from a household with an income of less than £25,000, which students can take as cash or a fee waiver. Click here to find out more.

The fun stuff

Nightlife: A bar on each site, with the biggest and busiest at the Park campus. Five student balls a year. Pubs, clubs and theatres can be found locally including literature, jazz and fringe festivals.

Price of a pint: About £3 in Cheltenham and roughly the same in Gloucester.

Sporting reputation: Pretty sporty- 40th in the current BUCS league.

Notable societies: Fun ways to stay fit and active while meeting new people include paintballing, dodgeball and snow club. Space is the student magazine, and highly recommended for would-be journalists.

Glittering alumni: Singer Beverley Knight; rugby international Jonathan Callard; presenter Adam Buxton of Adam and Joe fame; TV gardener Chris Beardshaw.

Alternative prospectus: See how students rate various aspects of their university experience at Gloucestershire on What Uni? here, from lecturers to accommodation and the students' union.

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