Glyndwr University

 

Overall ranking: Came 115th out of 124 in the Complete University Guide for 2014.

History: Glyndwr University was formed in July 2008, continuing a rich 121-year history of higher education in north east Wales. The origins of the university can be traced back to 1887, when miners pooled together their Whisky money – a tax on beer and spirits – to form the Wrexham School of Science and Arts. Higher-level education followed in 1892 and, in 1975, three colleges merged to form the North-east Wales Institute of Higher Education (Newi). Newi was granted taught-degree awarding powers and a full university title in July 2008, creating Glyndwr University.

Address: Two main sites near Wrexham. Plas Coch, next to the town's race course, holds most of the university's courses, while the North Wales School of Art and Design is based in Regent's Street in the town centre.It is also developing facilities in Northop, Flintshire, on the site of the Welsh College of Horticulture.

Ambience: Wrexham, close to the border between England and Wales, is surrounded by gorgeous countryside, while the town has developed immensely over the past few years. There is a retail and leisure park, including a multi-screen cinema, next to the main campus, and the usual spread of restaurants, clubs and pubs.

Who's the boss? Professor Michael Scott, a Shakespearean scholar. A distinguished literary author, he edited the influential Text and Performance series, encouraging the birth of a new approach to the study of Shakespeare in the UK, United States, Australia and elsewhere.

Prospectus: 01978 293 439 or request/view one online here.

UCAS code: G53

What you need to know

Easy to get into? 100 to 140 UCAS points are required for a foundation degree and 200 plus for an honours degree. Those with experience and commitment rather than formal qualifications are encouraged to apply.

Vital statistics: Students number more than 8,000. There is a high proportion of mature students and students from the local area, as well as international students.

Added value: There is a strong vocational emphasis where course subjects are concerned: teacher training, nursing, social work, engineering, computing, business and sports science, for example. Work placements are common and many courses lead to exemptions from professional bodies. The £5m Centre for the Creative Industries was used for the first time by students in 2011, and includes state-of-the-art TV and radio studios, 3D workshops, design studios, IT suites, Apple training suites and post-production audio and visual facilities. It has also become the new home to BBC Wales in Wrexham. The £2m Centre for the Child, Family Society opened for 2011 entrants.

Teaching: 115th out of 124 for student satisfaction with teaching quality in the Complete University Guide.

Research: 108th out of 124 in the Research Assessment Exercise.

Graduate prospects: 42nd out of 124 with 69.7 per cent finding graduate level employment.

Any accommodation? Yes and it costs between £78 and £105 per week. All properties are self-catering.

Cheap to live there? Very reasonable- between £55 and £70 per week for a room in a shared house.

Transport links: With decent road links and easy motorway access, a car helps. There are direct trains to London – one every four hours, on average – and it’s a 40-minute trip by train to Manchester or Liverpool. There is also a direct route to Cardiff, which takes two hours and 20 minutes.

Fees: Welsh and EU students pay around £3,575 per year towards their degree, with anything above that paid for by the Welsh government. Tired structure for UK students, depending on the course chosen. £8,138 for engineering, science and computing; £7,250 for medicine-related professions, education, journalism, media, art and design and built environment; £6, 435 for business and humanities and £4,235 for foundation degrees.

Bursaries: A range of mean-tested forms of financial support, with more details available here.

The fun stuff

Nightlife: Good for live music. Feeder, Bloc Party, The View, Super Furry Animals and Sugababes have all played in Wrexham. There are regular events on campus and student nights at local nightclubs, while everyone dresses up for the Summer Ball.

Price of a pint: £3 on average in Wrexham.

Sporting reputation: Poor- ranked 142nd out of 148 in the 2012/13 BUCS league.

Notable societies: Not a huge range, but plenty of scope to start your own. Try Bollywood Dance or GMag and GTV student media.

Glittering alumni: John Elfed Jones, former chairman of Welsh Water; Karen Sinclair AM, member of the Welsh Assembly; and Trevor Jones, managing director of Pilkington Optronics.

Alternative prospectus: Find out what current, former and prospective students have to say about their time at Glyndwr, and ask them your questions, on The Student Room here.

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