Huddersfield, University of

 

 

Overall ranking: 70th out of 123 in the 2015 Complete University Guide.

History: Founded in 1825 as a mechanics institute.

Address: Attractive campus on the edge of the town, with views across to the picturesque Pennines Hills and a canal flowing through it. Two campuses in Barnsley and Oldham opened in 2005.

Ambience: The Huddersfield campus is in the centre of this old wool town, close to the main shopping area. £80m has been spent on the estate in the last 10 years and in the coming year a further investment of £100m is planned. The buildings are a mix of old and new, including several award-winning mill conversions.

Who's the boss? Professor Bob Cryan, vice-chancellor. He's a local lad and proud to be an engineering graduate of the university itself.

Prospectus: 0870 901 5555 or request one here.

UCAS code: H60

What you need to know

Easy to get into? Committed to widening access, they ask for a minimum of between 260 and 280 UCAS points, or BBC at A-level. For most courses the figure is 300 points (BBB). Foundation degrees and HNDS can also lead to degree courses.

Vital statistics: Around 24,000 students, of whom around 3,600 are postgraduate students. Boasts a higher-than-average record for graduate employability. One of the top ten universities in the UK for sandwich courses. There's a decent sports hall on campus, but there's an even snazzier sports centre in town.

Added value: The chancellor is Patrick Stewart, movie star and local lad made good (Captain Jean Luc Picard in Star Trek: The Next Generation; X-Men). European study opportunities through formal exchange with universities and colleges in Denmark and France. Good links with local industry and health service providers and a business incubator programme. £21.5m learning and leisure centre has recently opened, while a £17m business school opened in September 2010. Huddersfield was awarded the title University of the Year 2013/14 by Times Higher Education. Its new £22.5 million Student Central Building – incorporating enhanced leisure and catering facilities, plus a wide range of student services, was opened at the start of 2014. New courses include degrees in supply chain management and  logistics that are backed by leading companies and guarantee employment upon completion of the course.

Teaching: 26th out of 123 in the Complete University Guide.

Graduate prospects: 52nd out of 123 with 67.4 per cent finding graduate level employment.

Any accommodation? The Storthes Hall Park student village and Ashenhurst student houses are the approved halls. Prices are £77 at Ashenhurst, or £100 a week in Storthes Hall. A regular shuttle bus runs between the campus and Storthes Hall too.

Cheap to live there? Oh yes. Average rents starts at £80 a week, including bills.

Transport links: The main campus is within walking distance of bus and railway stations. The M62 motorway is three miles to the north, with the M1 five miles to the west.

Fees: New full-time home and EU undergrads starting in 2014/15 will pay £8,250 a year.

Bursaries: Full-time students from families with annual incomes below £42,600 may be entitled to a non-repayable grant. Then there's the National Scholarships Programme and a variety of other awards up for grabs. Calculate your eligibility for financial support here.

The fun stuff

Nightlife: Range of nightclubs, pub chains and more traditional establishments. Barnsley isn't far from the student hub of Sheffield, and the bright lights of Manchester are only a stone's throw from Oldham.

Price of a pint: Averages at £2.50. Grab a pint of lager or cider for £1.50 from the union bar.

Sporting reputation: Not the sportiest, ranked 97th of out 148 in the current BUCS league.

Notable societies: Reckon yourself in with a chance of joining the University Challenge team? Join H-Quiz if so. For something a little more light-hearted, try Lasertag or Escape the Hudd. The latter aims to break the stigma surrounding hitch-hiking by providing fun events.

Glittering alumni: David Blunkett MP; George W Buckley, CEO of 3M; Sally Nugent, BBC journalist; and Sir John Harman, former chairman of the Environment Agency.

Alternative prospectus: Ask any burning questions and discuss life at Huddersfield with former, current and prospective students on The Student Room here.

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