Myerscough College

 

History: The college dates back to the 19th century (founded in 1894) with various sites accumulated on the way. Myerscough has been based at the current main site near Garstang since 1969.

Address: Spread over six campuses in 600 hectares of open, green surroundings, in the north west of England. If it's fresh air you're after, the surrounding countryside offers unlimited outdoorsy opportunities. On top of that it's still within easy reach of decent shopping and nightlife in nearby Preston, Lancaster and Blackpool.

Ambience: A friendly, laid back campus atmosphere within soothing pastures green. The rural location makes Myerscough the perfect place to study land-based and sports related courses.

Who's the boss? Ann Turner FCMA is the chief executive and principal. She got the job after a seven-year stint as the college's finance director.

Prospectus: 01995 642 211 or visit the website here.

UCAS code: M99

What you need to know

Easy to get into? Usually a minimum of 80 UCAS points to get onto a foundation degree course; 220 points or more to get onto a BA/BSc course.

Foundation Degrees: Over 30 on offer including commercial floral design; cricket coaching; equine management; football coaching; wastes management; horticulture; heavy plant machinery management and logistics.

Vital statistics: There are around 6,000 students, of whom around 700 are higher education students. Courses specialise in land-based and sports subjects, which include motorsports, golf, landscape, horticulture, animals, agriculture, equine and much more. The college is a member of the ELITE (English Land-based Institute of Training and Education) consortium of colleges.

Added value: Excellent links with universities in the USA, which offers students the opportunity to study there through an exchange programme. Many courses include work placements with the option to study abroad, and students have undertaken paid work placements around the world including Australia, New Zealand, USA, Canada, and Europe. The campus has also been recently improved: a new HE centre exclusive to degree students; a specialist library; halls of residence and a computer centre have all sprung up. There's an International Equine Arena, a National Centre for Arboriculture, a commercial plant centre, a modern sports centre, a Turf Technology Unit, and several motorsports workshops.

Teaching: In its 2010 inspection, Ofsted rated the college's overall effectiveness as 'satisfactory'. Provisions in horticulture, agriculture and floristry, and foundations for learning for life were both rated as 'good', but animal care and equine provision was said to be 'inadequate'.

Any accommodation? Yes - halls of residence are available for more than 650 students. £3,385 for a single en-suite with self-catering for a year and £5,185 for catering, both on 36-week contracts.

Cheap to live there? It can be. In the local area last year it cost between £55 and £80 per week for a room in a shared flat.

Transport links: The main site is just off the A6 Preston to Lancaster road, and Junction 32 on the M6. Buses are provided by the college. Trains run from Preston.

Fees: Honours degrees are £9,000 per year while foundation courses cost £7,500 annually.

Bursaries: Some bursaries and scholarships may be available from the University of Central Lancashire or through the National Scholarship Programme.

The fun stuff

Nightlife: The campus bar (the Stumble Inn) is open every night of the week and hosts regular themed events. There are two balls, at Christmas and during the summer. Nights out are organised in Preston, Blackpool and Lancaster. As the college is a partner college of the University of Central Lancashire, you can use their students' union too.

Sporting facilities: Sports pitches, an astroturf, a gym, a nine-hole golf course, a sports hall and a range of clubs to join. Plus you can make use of the University of Central Lancashire's facilities if you're on a HE degree course. There's even an off-road driving track!

Glittering alumni: None as yet.

News
Bobbi Kristina Brown with her mother Whitney Houston in 2011
people
News
The actress Geraldine McEwan was perhaps best known for playing Agatha Christie's detective, Miss Marple (Rex)
peopleShe won a Bafta in 1991 for her role in Oranges Are Not The Only Fruit
News
peopleHere's what Stephen Fry would say
Sport
David Silva celebrates with Sergio Aguero after equalising against Chelsea
footballChelsea 1 Manchester City 1
PROMOTED VIDEO
Arts and Entertainment
Caroline Proust as Captain Laure Berthaud in 'Spiral'
tvReview: Gritty, engaging and well-acted - it’s a wonder France’s biggest TV export isn’t broadcast on a more mainstream channel
Arts and Entertainment
music
Arts and Entertainment
Laura Carmichael in still from Madam Bovary trailer
film
News
i100
Sport
Serena Williams holds the Australian Open title
sportAustralia Open 2015 final report

Day In a Page

As in 1942, Germany must show restraint over Greece

As in 1942, Germany must show restraint over Greece

Mussolini tried to warn his ally of the danger of bringing the country to its knees. So should we, says Patrick Cockburn
Britain's widening poverty gap should be causing outrage at the start of the election campaign

The short stroll that should be our walk of shame

Courting the global elite has failed to benefit Britain, as the vast disparity in wealth on display in the capital shows
Homeless Veterans appeal: The rise of the working poor: when having a job cannot prevent poverty

Homeless Veterans appeal

The rise of the working poor: when having a job cannot prevent poverty
Prince Charles the saviour of the nation? A new book highlights concerns about how political he will be when he eventually becomes king

Prince Charles the saviour of the nation?

A new book highlights concerns about how political he will be when he eventually becomes king
How books can defeat Isis: Patrick Cockburn was able to update his agenda-setting 'The Rise of Islamic State' while under attack in Baghdad

How books can defeat Isis

Patrick Cockburn was able to update his agenda-setting 'The Rise of Islamic State' while under attack in Baghdad
Judith Hackitt: The myths of elf 'n' safety

Judith Hackitt: The myths of elf 'n' safety

She may be in charge of minimising our risks of injury, but the chair of the Health and Safety Executive still wants children to be able to hurt themselves
The open loathing between Barack Obama and Benjamin Netanyahu just got worse

The open loathing between Obama and Netanyahu just got worse

The Israeli PM's relationship with the Obama has always been chilly, but going over the President's head on Iran will do him no favours, says Rupert Cornwell
French chefs get 'le huff' as nation slips down global cuisine rankings

French chefs get 'le huff' as nation slips down global cuisine rankings

Fury at British best restaurants survey sees French magazine produce a rival list
Star choreographer Matthew Bourne gives young carers a chance to perform at Sadler's Wells

Young carers to make dance debut

What happened when superstar choreographer Matthew Bourne encouraged 27 teenage carers to think about themselves for once?
Design Council's 70th anniversary: Four of the most intriguing prototypes from Ones to Watch

Design Council's 70th anniversary

Four of the most intriguing prototypes from Ones to Watch
Art should not be a slave to the ideas driving it

Art should not be a slave to the ideas driving it

Critics of Tom Stoppard's new play seem to agree that cerebral can never trump character, says DJ Taylor
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef's winter salads will make you feel energised through February

Bill Granger's winter salads

Salads aren't just a bit on the side, says our chef - their crunch, colour and natural goodness are perfect for a midwinter pick-me-up
England vs Wales: Cool head George Ford ready to put out dragon fire

George Ford: Cool head ready to put out dragon fire

No 10’s calmness under pressure will be key for England in Cardiff
Michael Calvin: Time for Old Firm to put aside bigotry and forge new links

Michael Calvin's Last Word

Time for Old Firm to put aside bigotry and forge new links