Myerscough College

 

History: The college dates back to the 19th century (founded in 1894) with various sites accumulated on the way. Myerscough has been based at the current main site near Garstang since 1969.

Address: Spread over six campuses in 600 hectares of open, green surroundings, in the north west of England. If it's fresh air you're after, the surrounding countryside offers unlimited outdoorsy opportunities. On top of that it's still within easy reach of decent shopping and nightlife in nearby Preston, Lancaster and Blackpool.

Ambience: A friendly, laid back campus atmosphere within soothing pastures green. The rural location makes Myerscough the perfect place to study land-based and sports related courses.

Who's the boss? Ann Turner FCMA is the chief executive and principal. She got the job after a seven-year stint as the college's finance director.

Prospectus: 01995 642 211 or visit the website here.

UCAS code: M99

What you need to know

Easy to get into? Usually a minimum of 80 UCAS points to get onto a foundation degree course; 220 points or more to get onto a BA/BSc course.

Foundation Degrees: Over 30 on offer including commercial floral design; cricket coaching; equine management; football coaching; wastes management; horticulture; heavy plant machinery management and logistics.

Vital statistics: There are around 6,000 students, of whom around 700 are higher education students. Courses specialise in land-based and sports subjects, which include motorsports, golf, landscape, horticulture, animals, agriculture, equine and much more. The college is a member of the ELITE (English Land-based Institute of Training and Education) consortium of colleges.

Added value: Excellent links with universities in the USA, which offers students the opportunity to study there through an exchange programme. Many courses include work placements with the option to study abroad, and students have undertaken paid work placements around the world including Australia, New Zealand, USA, Canada, and Europe. The campus has also been recently improved: a new HE centre exclusive to degree students; a specialist library; halls of residence and a computer centre have all sprung up. There's an International Equine Arena, a National Centre for Arboriculture, a commercial plant centre, a modern sports centre, a Turf Technology Unit, and several motorsports workshops.

Teaching: In its 2010 inspection, Ofsted rated the college's overall effectiveness as 'satisfactory'. Provisions in horticulture, agriculture and floristry, and foundations for learning for life were both rated as 'good', but animal care and equine provision was said to be 'inadequate'.

Any accommodation? Yes - halls of residence are available for more than 650 students. £3,385 for a single en-suite with self-catering for a year and £5,185 for catering, both on 36-week contracts.

Cheap to live there? It can be. In the local area last year it cost between £55 and £80 per week for a room in a shared flat.

Transport links: The main site is just off the A6 Preston to Lancaster road, and Junction 32 on the M6. Buses are provided by the college. Trains run from Preston.

Fees: Honours degrees are £9,000 per year while foundation courses cost £7,500 annually.

Bursaries: Some bursaries and scholarships may be available from the University of Central Lancashire or through the National Scholarship Programme.

The fun stuff

Nightlife: The campus bar (the Stumble Inn) is open every night of the week and hosts regular themed events. There are two balls, at Christmas and during the summer. Nights out are organised in Preston, Blackpool and Lancaster. As the college is a partner college of the University of Central Lancashire, you can use their students' union too.

Sporting facilities: Sports pitches, an astroturf, a gym, a nine-hole golf course, a sports hall and a range of clubs to join. Plus you can make use of the University of Central Lancashire's facilities if you're on a HE degree course. There's even an off-road driving track!

Glittering alumni: None as yet.

Voices
Numbers of complaints about unwanted calls have trebled in just six months
voices
News
people
Arts & Entertainment
Picture of innocence: Ricky Gervais and Karl Pilkington in ‘Derek’
tvReview: The insights of Ricky Gervais's sweet and kind character call to mind Karl Pilkington's faux-naïf podcast observations
Life & Style
Looking familiar: The global biometrics industry is expected to grow to $20bn by 2020
tech
VIDEO
News
Higher expectations: European economies are growing but the recovery remains weak
newsThe eurozone crisis has tipped many into despair and extremism - this radically altered landscape calls for a new kind of politics, argues economist Philippe Legrain
Arts & Entertainment
Tangled up in blue: Singer-songwriter Judith Owen
musicAnd how husband Harry Shearer - of Spinal Tap and The Simpsons fame - helped her music flourish
Sport
Karim Benzema celebrates scoring the opening goal
sportReal Madrid 1 Bayern Munich 0: Germans will need their legendary self-belief to rescue Champions League tie in second leg
Arts & Entertainment
Paul Weller: 'I am a big supporter of independent record stores but the greedy touts making a fast buck off genuine fans is disgusting'
music
Arts & Entertainment
William Shakespeare's influence on English culture is still strongly felt today, from his plays on stage to words we use everyday
arts
Sport
Manchester United manager David Moyes has claimed supporters understand the need to look at
sportScot thanks club staff and fans, but gives no specific mention of players
News
Strange 'quack' noises could be undersea chatter of Minke whales
science
News
weird news... and film it, obviously
Life & Style
Balancing act: City workers at the launch of Cityfathers
lifeThe organisation is the brainchild of Louisa Symington-Mills who set up Citymothers in 2012 - a group boasting more than 3,000 members
Arts & Entertainment
tv
News
Fresh hope: Ruth Womak and her dog Jess. A free training course in basic computing skills changed Ruth’s life
educationHow a housing association's remarkable educational initiative gave hope to tenant battling long-term illness and depression

Day In a Page

Migrants in Britain a decade on: The Poles who brought prosperity

Migrants in Britain a decade on

The Poles who brought prosperity
Philippe Legrain: 'The eurozone crisis has tipped many into disillusionment, despair and extremism - we need a European Spring'

Philippe Legrain: 'We need a European Spring'

The eurozone crisis has tipped many into disillusionment, despair and extremism - this radically altered landscape calls for a new kind of politics, argues the economist
A History of the First World War in 100 moments: A moment of glory on the Western Front for the soldiers of the Raj

A History of the First World War in 100 moments

A moment of glory on the Western Front for the soldiers of the Raj
Judith Owen reveals how husband Harry Shearer - star of This Is Spinal Tap and The Simpsons - helped her music flourish

Judith Owen: 'How my husband helped my music flourish'

Her mother's suicide and father's cancer also informed the singer-songwriter's new album, says Pierre Perrone
The online lifeline: How a housing association's remarkable educational initiative gave hope to tenant battling long-term illness and depression

Online lifeline: Housing association's educational initiative

South Yorkshire Housing Association's free training courses gave hope to tenant battling long-term illness and depression
Face-recognition software: Is this the end of anonymity for all of us?

Face-recognition software: The end of anonymity?

The software is already used for military surveillance, by police to identify suspects - and on Facebook
Train Kick Selfie Guy is set to scoop up to $250,000 thanks to his viral video - so how can you cash in on your candid moments?

Viral videos: Cashing in on candid moments

Train Kick Selfie Guy Jared Frank could receive anything between $30,000 to $250,000 for his misfortune - and that's just his cut of advertising revenue from being viewed on YouTube
The world's fastest elevators - 20 metres per second - are coming soon to China

World's fastest elevators coming soon to China

Whatever next? Simon Usborne finds out from Britain's highest authority on the subject
Cityfathers tackles long-hours culture that causes men to miss out on seeing their children

Cityfathers tackles long-hours culture

The organisation is the brainchild of Louisa Symington-Mills, a chief operating officer who set up Citymothers in 2012 - a group that now boasts more than 3,000 members
Brits who migrate to Costa del Sol more unhappy than those who stay at home

It's not always fun in the sun: Moving abroad does not guarantee happiness

Brits who migrate to Costa del Sol more unhappy than those who stay at home
Migrants in Britain a decade on: They came, they worked, they stayed in Lincolnshire

Migrants in Britain a decade on

They came, they worked, they stayed in Lincolnshire
Chris Addison on swapping politics for pillow talk

Chris Addison on swapping politics for pillow talk

The 'Thick of It' favourite thinks the romcom is an 'awful genre'. So why is he happy with a starring role in Sky Living's new Lake District-set series 'Trying Again'?
Why musicians play into their old age

Why musicians play into their old age

Nick Hasted looks at how they are driven by a burning desire to keep on entertaining fans despite risking ridicule
How can you tell a gentleman?

How can you tell a gentleman?

A list of public figures with gallant attributes by Country Life magazine throws a fascinating light on what it means to be a gentleman in the modern world
Pet a porter: posh pet pampering

Pet a porter: posh pet pampering

The duo behind Asos and Achica have launched a new venture offering haute couture to help make furry companions fashionable