Norwich University of the Arts

 

 

History: Origins go back to 1845, when the Norwich School of Design was founded by followers of the Norwich School of Painters. Has had degree provision since 1965. Merged with Great Yarmouth College of Art to form the Norfolk Institute of Art and Design in 1989, and in 1991 it became an associate college of Anglia Polytechnic. In November 2007, it was granted degree-awarding power and was renamed Norwich University College of Arts. Changed to its current name in 2012.

Address: Centre of Norwich. A unique campus of several buildings, ranging from medieval to modern.

Ambience: Great location in the heart of the city centre, overlooking the River Wensum. Norwich is the arts and cultural capital of the east of England, and fosters a warm and welcoming attitude to its student population and a positive attitude to arts and culture.

Who's the boss? Professor John Last, who brings decades of experience of art and design higher education and was previously at the Arts University College Bournemouth.

Prospectus: 01603 610 561 or request one online here.

UCAS code: N39

What you need to know

Easy to get into? The key thing for getting a place is a strong portfolio. Almost all applicants are interviewed. Average entry requirements are 280 to 300 UCAS points, but this varies between courses and is not applicable to year 0.

Vital statistics: A dynamic, modern and creative community with around 2,000 full-time students. Offers foundation degrees, BA degrees and MAs as well as research degrees.

Added value: You get the gallery thrown in, a hotbed of contemporary art. A respected programme of exhibitions and events by internationally recognised artists, curators and media practitioners has recently included: Hayward Touring shows by Jake and Dinos Chapman and Michael Craig-Martin, legendary graphic designer Lance Wyman, British pop artists Colin Self and sculptor Roger Ackling. Research degrees are offered in partnership with the University of the Arts, London.

Any accommodation? Yes- the university currently boasts 165 bedrooms with plans to develop city centre-based properties. Rent varies from £98 to £136 a week.

Cheap to live there? Not bad - only £65 to £80 per week for a privately-rented room, excluding bills.

Transport links: Norwich is less than two hours from London and an hour from Cambridge. There are regular trains to and from the Midlands and the North. Norwich International Airport has daily flights to the UK and Europe, including regular flights to the global hub of Amsterdam Schiphol. Stansted Airport is accessible by road and public transport.

Fees: Tuition for full-time home and EU undergrads for 2014 intake is £9,000.

Bursaries: A means-tested, non-repayable grant of up to £1,000 per year is available to eligible students in receipt of a full maintenance grant who are not awarded a National Scholarship. Interested? Click here.

The fun stuff

Nightlife: Student bar is a fabulous room with a stage at one end and huge timber beams and ceiling. Otherwise, students frequent Norwich's numerous pubs and clubs. Fabulous Christmas Ball organised by the student-led Events Committee.

Price of a pint: £3.20 on average in Norwich but cheaper students nights and union drinks deals will save you some cash.

Sporting reputation: A range of clubs and societies are run by the students' union but NUA doesn't compete in the BUCS league.

Notable societies: Successful student magazine Storehouse, designed funded and distributed by students, showcasing their work.

Glittering alumni: Glenn Brown, Turner Prize nominee; Keith Chapman, creator of Bob the Builder; Tim Stoner, Becks Futures winner, Jim Sutherland, founder of hat-trick design agency.

Alternative prospectus: Check into The Student Room to chat with current students and ask any questions about life at Norwich University of the Arts.

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